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Sedentary Behaviours in Mid-Adulthood and Subsequent Body Mass Index

Pereira, SMP; Power, C; (2013) Sedentary Behaviours in Mid-Adulthood and Subsequent Body Mass Index. PLOS ONE , 8 (6) , Article e65791. 10.1371/journal.pone.0065791. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives It is unclear whether sedentary behaviour, and the domain in which it occurs, is related to body mass index (BMI) change. We aim to elucidate whether sedentary behaviour is prospectively related to BMI change using markers from three domains (leisure, work and commuting). Methods Among employed 1958 British birth cohort members (n = 6,562), we analysed whether TV-viewing, work sitting (six categories: 0 h/d to >4 h/d) and motorised commuting (at 45 y) were related to BMI (at 45 y and 50 y) and BMI change 45–50 y, after adjusting for lifestyle and socioeconomic factors. Results Per category higher TV-viewing, 45 y and 50 y BMI were higher by 0.69 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.59,0.80) and 0.75 kg/m2 (0.64,0.86) respectively. A category higher TV-viewing was associated with 0.11 kg/m2 (0.06,0.17) increased BMI 45–50 y, attenuating to 0.06 kg/m2 (0.01,0.12) after adjustment. There was no trend for work sitting with 45 y or 50 y BMI, nor, after adjustment, for BMI change. However, those sitting 2–3 h/d had greater BMI gain by 0.33 kg/m2 (0.10,0.56) compared to those sitting 0–1 h/d. Associations between TV-viewing and BMI change were independent of work sitting. Motorised commuting was associated with 45 y, but not 50 y BMI or change. Conclusions TV-viewing is associated with BMI gain in mid-adulthood; evidence is weaker for other sedentary behaviours.

Type: Article
Title: Sedentary Behaviours in Mid-Adulthood and Subsequent Body Mass Index
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0065791
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0065791
Language: English
Additional information: © 2013 Pinto Pereira, Power. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1397533
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