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Causal relationship between obesity and vitamin D status: bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis of multiple cohorts.

Vimaleswaran, KS; Berry, DJ; Lu, C; Tikkanen, E; Pilz, S; Hiraki, LT; Cooper, JD; ... Hyppönen, E; + view all (2013) Causal relationship between obesity and vitamin D status: bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis of multiple cohorts. PLoS Med , 10 (2) , Article e1001383. 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001383. Green open access

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Abstract

Obesity is associated with vitamin D deficiency, and both are areas of active public health concern. We explored the causality and direction of the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] using genetic markers as instrumental variables (IVs) in bi-directional Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis.

Type: Article
Title: Causal relationship between obesity and vitamin D status: bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis of multiple cohorts.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001383
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001383
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright: © 2013 Vimaleswaran et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: The authors thank the British Heart Foundation (grant PG/09/023) and the UK Medical Research Council (MRC; grant G0601653) for funding this work. ADH is a British Heart Foundation Senior Research Fellow (Award FS05/125). EH is a Department of Health (UK) Public Health Career Scientist. This work was undertaken at the Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, which benefits from funding support from the MRC in its capacity as the MRC Centre of Epidemiology for Child Health. Research at the University College London Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust benefits from R&D funding received from the NHS Executive. No funding bodies had any role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Competing interests: LTH is currently supported by a Canada Institute of Research (CIHR) Fellowship award. CC has received honoraria and consulting fees from Amgen, Eli Lilly, Medtronic, Merck, Novartis, and Servier. WM is an employee of synlab laboratory services GmbH. Synlab offers vitamin D testing. TJW is on the scientific advisory board for Diasorin Inc. and has received research support from them. JCW is 90% employed by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) whilst maintaining a 10% appointment at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), and holds GSK shares. All other authors declare that no competing interests exist.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Pop, Policy and Practice Prog
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1385278
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