UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

How well do clinical prediction rules perform in identifying serious infections in acutely ill children across an international network of ambulatory care datasets?

Verbakel, JY; Van den Bruel, A; Thompson, M; Stevens, R; Aertgeerts, B; Oostenbrink, R; Moll, HA; ... European Research Network on Recognising Serious Infection (ERNI, ; + view all (2013) How well do clinical prediction rules perform in identifying serious infections in acutely ill children across an international network of ambulatory care datasets? BMC Medicine , 11 , Article 10. 10.1186/1741-7015-11-10. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
1741-7015-11-10.pdf

Download (431kB)
[img] MS Word (Additional file 1: Details of the clinical prediction rules identified in the systematic review)
1741-7015-11-10-s1.doc

Download (104kB)
[img] Excel Spreadsheet (Additional file 2: Variables and proxies used for validation of clinical prediction rules)
1741-7015-11-10-s2.xls

Download (69kB)
[img] Excel Spreadsheet (Additional file 3: Variables and proxies used for fever guidelines validation)
1741-7015-11-10-s3.xls

Download (46kB)
[img] Excel Spreadsheet (Additional file 4: Sensitivity analyses)
1741-7015-11-10-s4.xls

Download (41kB)

Abstract

Diagnosing serious infections in children is challenging, because of the low incidence of such infections and their non-specific presentation early in the course of illness. Prediction rules are promoted as a means to improve recognition of serious infections. A recent systematic review identified seven clinical prediction rules, of which only one had been prospectively validated, calling into question their appropriateness for clinical practice. We aimed to examine the diagnostic accuracy of these rules in multiple ambulatory care populations in Europe.

Type: Article
Title: How well do clinical prediction rules perform in identifying serious infections in acutely ill children across an international network of ambulatory care datasets?
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/1741-7015-11-10
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-11-10
Language: English
Additional information: PMCID: PMC3566974 © 2013 Verbakel et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Acute Disease, Adolescent, Ambulatory Care, Belgium, Child, Child, Preschool, Clinical Medicine, Communicable Diseases, Decision Support Techniques, Female, Great Britain, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, International Cooperation, Male, Netherlands, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Sensitivity and Specificity
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1384560
Downloads since deposit
174Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item