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The utility of liver function tests for mortality prediction within one year in primary care using the algorithm for liver function investigations (ALFI).

McLernon, DJ; Dillon, JF; Sullivan, FM; Roderick, P; Rosenberg, WM; Ryder, SD; Donnan, PT; (2012) The utility of liver function tests for mortality prediction within one year in primary care using the algorithm for liver function investigations (ALFI). PLoS One , 7 (12) , Article e50965. 10.1371/journal.pone.0050965. Green open access

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Abstract

Although liver function tests (LFTs) are routinely measured in primary care, raised levels in patients with no obvious liver disease may trigger a range of subsequent expensive and unnecessary management plans. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a prediction model to guide decision-making by general practitioners, which estimates risk of one year all-cause mortality in patients with no obvious liver disease.

Type: Article
Title: The utility of liver function tests for mortality prediction within one year in primary care using the algorithm for liver function investigations (ALFI).
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0050965
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0050965
Language: English
Additional information: © 2012 McLernon et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This work was supported by the National Health Service Research & Development Programme Health Technology Assessment Programme (project number 03/38/02) and the Backett Weir Russell Career Development Fellowship. Department of Health Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed therein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Department of Health. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. The authors have read the journal's policy and have the following conflicts: DJM (while employed by the University of Dundee), PTD, JFD, and FMS declare financial support to their institutions for the submitted work from the UK National Health Service Research & Development Programme Health Technology Assessment Programme. DJM declares financial support to his institution for the submitted work from the Backett Weir Russell Career Development Fellowship. SR received reimbursement of travel costs to attend study meetings from the UK National Health Service Research & Development Programme Health Technology Assessment Programme grant. PR and WMR have no competing interests to declare.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1384078
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