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C. elegans expressing human β2-microglobulin: a novel model for studying the relationship between the molecular assembly and the toxic phenotype.

Diomede, L; Soria, C; Romeo, M; Giorgetti, S; Marchese, L; Mangione, PP; Porcari, R; ... Stoppini, M; + view all (2012) C. elegans expressing human β2-microglobulin: a novel model for studying the relationship between the molecular assembly and the toxic phenotype. PLoS One , 7 (12) , Article e52314. 10.1371/journal.pone.0052314. Green open access

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Abstract

Availability of living organisms to mimic key step of amyloidogenesis of human protein has become an indispensable tool for our translation approach aiming at filling the deep gap existing between the biophysical and biochemical data obtained in vitro and the pathological features observed in patients. Human β(2)-microglobulin (β(2)-m) causes systemic amyloidosis in haemodialysed patients. The structure, misfolding propensity, kinetics of fibrillogenesis and cytotoxicity of this protein, in vitro, have been studied more extensively than for any other globular protein. However, no suitable animal model for β(2)-m amyloidosis has been so far reported. We have now established and characterized three new transgenic C. elegans strains expressing wild type human β(2)-m and two highly amyloidogenic isoforms: P32G variant and the truncated form ΔN6 lacking of the 6 N-terminal residues. The expression of human β(2)-m affects the larval growth of C. elegans and the severity of the damage correlates with the intrinsic propensity to self-aggregate that has been reported in previous in vitro studies. We have no evidence of the formation of amyloid deposits in the body-wall muscles of worms. However, we discovered a strict correlation between the pathological phenotype and the presence of oligomeric species recognized by the A11 antibody. The strains expressing human β(2)-m exhibit a locomotory defect quantified with the body bends assay. Here we show that tetracyclines can correct this abnormality confirming that these compounds are able to protect a living organism from the proteotoxicity of human β(2)-m.

Type: Article
Title: C. elegans expressing human β2-microglobulin: a novel model for studying the relationship between the molecular assembly and the toxic phenotype.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052314
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0052314
Language: English
Additional information: © 2012 Diomede et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. This work was partly supported by Cariplo Foundation (Project n. 2009-2543, and 2011-2096), Intesa San Paolo Foundation, the Italian Ministry of University and Research (Projects FIRB RBFR109EOS and PRIN 20083ERXWS), Regione Lombardia, Fondazione Banca del Monte di Lombardia and MRC UK: strategic award to Vittorio Bellotti. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1382778
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