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Plastic compressed collagen as a novel carrier for expanded human corneal endothelial cells for transplantation.

Levis, HJ; Peh, GS; Toh, KP; Poh, R; Shortt, AJ; Drake, RA; Mehta, JS; (2012) Plastic compressed collagen as a novel carrier for expanded human corneal endothelial cells for transplantation. PLoS One , 7 (11) , Article e50993. 10.1371/journal.pone.0050993. Green open access

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Abstract

Current treatments for reversible blindness caused by corneal endothelial cell failure involve replacing the failed endothelium with donor tissue using a one donor-one recipient strategy. Due to the increasing pressure of a worldwide donor cornea shortage there has been considerable interest in developing alternative strategies to treat endothelial disorders using expanded cell replacement therapy. Protocols have been developed which allow successful expansion of endothelial cells in vitro but this approach requires a supporting material that would allow easy transfer of cells to the recipient. We describe the first use of plastic compressed collagen as a highly effective, novel carrier for human corneal endothelial cells. A human corneal endothelial cell line and primary human corneal endothelial cells retained their characteristic cobblestone morphology and expression of tight junction protein ZO-1 and pump protein Na+/K+ ATPase α1 after culture on collagen constructs for up to 14 days. Additionally, ultrastructural analysis suggested a well-integrated endothelial layer with tightly opposed cells and apical microvilli. Plastic compressed collagen is a superior biomaterial in terms of its speed and ease of production and its ability to be manipulated in a clinically relevant manner without breakage. This method provides expanded endothelial cells with a substrate that could be suitable for transplantation allowing one donor cornea to potentially treat multiple patients.

Type: Article
Title: Plastic compressed collagen as a novel carrier for expanded human corneal endothelial cells for transplantation.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0050993
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0050993
Language: English
Additional information: © 2012 Levis et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. The study was supported by the Technology Strategy Board, the EPSRC (HL), the National Institute for the Health Research Biomedical Research Centre for Ophthalmology, Moorfields Eye Hospital and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology (JTD), the National Research Foundation Translational and Clinical Research Programme Grant, Singapore (R621/42/2008), and the Biomedical Research Council, Translational Clinical Research Partnership Grant, Singapore (TCR0101673) (GSP, RP, KPT, JSM). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. I have read the journal's policy and have the following conflicts. Patent filed PCT/GB2011/000845 - Biomimetic Corneal Tissue. Authors on the patent are Julie Daniels, Rosemary Drake and Hannah Levis. However, this patent is not expected to provide any financial gain to the authors based on the publication of this manuscript. Additionally Rosemary Drake is a scientific officer at TAP Biosystems. This does not alter the authors' adherence to all the PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1380643
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