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Neural and behavioral correlates of aberrant salience in individuals at risk for psychosis

Roiser, JP; Howes, OD; Chaddock, CA; Joyce, EM; McGuire, P; (2013) Neural and behavioral correlates of aberrant salience in individuals at risk for psychosis. Schizophrenia Bulletin , 39 (6) 1328 - 1336. 10.1093/schbul/sbs147. Green open access

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Abstract

The "aberrant salience" model proposes that psychotic symptoms first emerge when chaotic brain dopamine transmission leads to the attribution of significance to stimuli that would normally be considered irrelevant. This is thought to occur during the prodromal phase of psychotic disorders, but this prediction has not been tested previously. In the present study, we tested this model in 18 healthy volunteers and 18 unmedicated individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis. Subjects performed the Salience Attribution Test, which provides behavioral measures of adaptive and aberrant motivational salience, during functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess neural responses to relevant and irrelevant stimulus features. On a separate occasion, the same subjects were also studied with [(18)F]fluorodopa positron emission tomography to measure dopamine synthesis capacity. Individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis were more likely to attribute motivational salience to irrelevant stimulus features (t(26.7) = 2.8, P = .008), and this bias was related to the severity of their delusion-like symptoms (r = .62, P = .008). Ventral striatal responses to irrelevant stimulus features were also correlated with delusion-like symptoms in the ultra-high risk group (r = .59, P = .017). Striatal dopamine synthesis capacity correlated negatively with hippocampal responses to irrelevant stimulus features in ultra-high risk individuals, but this relationship was positive in controls. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that aberrant salience processing underlies psychotic symptoms and involves functional alterations in the striatum, hippocampus, and the subcortical dopamine system.

Type: Article
Title: Neural and behavioral correlates of aberrant salience in individuals at risk for psychosis
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/schbul/sbs147
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbs147
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: aberrant salience, dopamine, functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, psychosis, salience attribution test, Adult, Basal Ganglia, Cerebrum, Delusions, Dihydroxyphenylalanine, Dopamine, Female, Functional Neuroimaging, Hippocampus, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Positron-Emission Tomography, Prodromal Symptoms, Psychotic Disorders, Risk, Severity of Illness Index, Young Adult
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1380446
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