UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

HIV treatment as prevention: systematic comparison of mathematical models of the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy on HIV incidence in South Africa.

Eaton, JW; Johnson, LF; Salomon, JA; Bärnighausen, T; Bendavid, E; Bershteyn, A; Bloom, DE; ... Hallett, TB; + view all (2012) HIV treatment as prevention: systematic comparison of mathematical models of the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy on HIV incidence in South Africa. PLoS Med , 9 (7) , Article e1001245. 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001245. Green open access

[img]
Preview
PDF
1376857.pdf

Download (426kB)

Abstract

Many mathematical models have investigated the impact of expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) on new HIV infections. Comparing results and conclusions across models is challenging because models have addressed slightly different questions and have reported different outcome metrics. This study compares the predictions of several mathematical models simulating the same ART intervention programmes to determine the extent to which models agree about the epidemiological impact of expanded ART.

Type: Article
Title: HIV treatment as prevention: systematic comparison of mathematical models of the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy on HIV incidence in South Africa.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001245
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001245
Language: English
Additional information: © 2012 Eaton et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: The HIV Modelling Consortium is supported by a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to Imperial College London. JWE thanks the Marshall Aid and Commemoration Commission for scholarship support. EFL acknowledges support from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01-DA15612). Till Bärnighausen was supported through grant R01 HD058482-01 from the National Institute of Child Health and Development, US National Institutes of Health (NIH); 1R01MH083539-01 from the National Institute of Mental Health, NIH; World Bank; and the Wellcome Trust; and he received funding for research on economic evaluation of Dengue vaccination from Sanofi-Pasteur and for research on economic evaluation of human papilloma virus vaccination from Merck. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript. Competing interests: I have read the journal's policy and have the following conflicts: JAS is a member of the PLoS Medicine Editorial Board. TB, DEB, and SH received a grant from the World Bank Global HIV/AIDS program through the Economics Reference Group for the initial development of the BBH model.
Keywords: Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Computer Simulation, HIV, HIV Infections, Health Planning, Humans, Incidence, Models, Biological, Prevalence, South Africa
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1376857
Downloads since deposit
191Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item