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'All the better for not seeing you': Effects of communicative context on the speech of an individual with acquired communication difficulties

Bruce, C; Braidwood, U; Newton, C; (2013) 'All the better for not seeing you': Effects of communicative context on the speech of an individual with acquired communication difficulties. Journal of Communication Disorders , 46 (5-6) pp. 475-483. 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2013.08.002. Green open access

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Abstract

Evidence shows that speakers adjust their speech depending on the demands of the listener. However, it is unclear whether people with acquired communication disorders can and do make similar adaptations. This study investigated the impact of different conversational settings on the intelligibility of a speaker with acquired communication difficulties. Twenty-eight assessors listened to recordings of the speaker reading aloud 40 words and 32 sentences to a listener who was either face-to-face or unseen. The speaker's ability to convey information was measured by the accuracy of assessors’ orthographic transcriptions of the words and sentences. Assessors’ scores were significantly higher in the unseen condition for the single word task particularly if they had heard the face-to-face condition first. Scores for the sentence task were significantly higher in the second presentation regardless of the condition. The results from this study suggest that therapy conducted in situations where the client is not able to see their conversation partner may encourage them to perform at a higher level and increase the clarity of their speech. / Learning outcomes: Readers will be able to describe: (1) the range of conversational adjustments made by speakers without communication difficulties; (2) differences between these tasks in offering contextual information to the listener; and (3) the potential for using challenging communicative situations to improve the performance of adults with communication disorders.

Type: Article
Title: 'All the better for not seeing you': Effects of communicative context on the speech of an individual with acquired communication difficulties
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2013.08.002
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcomdis.2013.08.002
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2013. This manuscript version is published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Non-derivative 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). This licence allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work for personal and non-commercial use providing author and publisher attribution is clearly stated. Further details about CC BY licences are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0.
Keywords: science & technology, social sciences, life sciences & biomedicine, audiology & speech-language pathology, linguistics, rehabilitation, audiology & speech-language pathology, linguistics, rehabilitation, SCI, rehabilitation, SSCI, acquired communication difficulties, intelligibility, speaker adaptation, dysarthric speech, sentence intelligibility, disease, speaker, impact, adults
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1364473
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