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Direction Opponency, Not Quadrature, Is Key to the 1/4 Cycle Preference for Apparent Motion in the Motion Energy Model

Heess, N; Bair, W; (2010) Direction Opponency, Not Quadrature, Is Key to the 1/4 Cycle Preference for Apparent Motion in the Motion Energy Model. The Journal of Neuroscience , 30 (34) 11300 - 11304. 10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.1271-10.2010. Green open access

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Abstract

Sensitivity to visual motion is a fundamental property of neurons in the visual cortex and has received wide attention in terms of mathematical models. A key feature of many popular models for cortical motion sensors is the use of pairs of functions that are related by a 90° phase shift. This phase relationship, known as quadrature, is the hallmark of the motion energy model and played an important role in the development of a class of model dubbed elaborated Reichardt detectors. For decades, the literature has supported a link between quadrature and the observation that motion detectors and human observers often prefer a 1/4 cycle displacement of an apparent motion stimulus that consists of a pair of sinusoidal gratings. We show that there is essentially no link between quadrature and this preference. Quadrature is neither necessary nor sufficient for a motion sensor to prefer 1/4 cycle displacement, and motion energy is not maximized for a 1/4 cycle step. Other properties of motion sensors are the key: the opponent subtraction of two oppositely tuned stages that individually have sinusoidal displacement tuning curves. Thus, psychophysical and neurophysiological data revealing a preference at or near 1/4 cycle displacement do not offer specific support for common quadrature or energy-based motion models. Instead, they point to a broader class of model.

Type: Article
Title: Direction Opponency, Not Quadrature, Is Key to the 1/4 Cycle Preference for Apparent Motion in the Motion Energy Model
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1523/​JNEUROSCI.1271-10.2010
Publisher version: http://www.jneurosci.org/content/30/34/11300.abstr...
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The license allows you to copy, distribute, and transmit the work, as well as adapting it. However, you must attribute the work to the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work), and cannot use the work for commercial purposes without prior permission of the author. If you alter or build upon this work, you can distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1361981
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