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Visual and audiovisual effects of isochronous timing on visual perception and brain activity

Marchant, JL; Driver, J; (2013) Visual and audiovisual effects of isochronous timing on visual perception and brain activity. Cerebral Cortex , 23 (6) 1290 -1298. 10.1093/cercor/bhs095. Green open access

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Abstract

Understanding how the brain extracts and combines temporal structure (rhythm) information from events presented to different senses remains unresolved. Many neuroimaging beat perception studies have focused on the auditory domain and show the presence of a highly regular beat (isochrony) in "auditory" stimulus streams enhances neural responses in a distributed brain network and affects perceptual performance. Here, we acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of brain activity while healthy human participants performed a visual task on isochronous versus randomly timed "visual" streams, with or without concurrent task-irrelevant sounds. We found that visual detection of higher intensity oddball targets was better for isochronous than randomly timed streams, extending previous auditory findings to vision. The impact of isochrony on visual target sensitivity correlated positively with fMRI signal changes not only in visual cortex but also in auditory sensory cortex during audiovisual presentations. Visual isochrony activated a similar timing-related brain network to that previously found primarily in auditory beat perception work. Finally, activity in multisensory left posterior superior temporal sulcus increased specifically during concurrent isochronous audiovisual presentations. These results indicate that regular isochronous timing can modulate visual processing and this can also involve multisensory audiovisual brain mechanisms.

Type: Article
Title: Visual and audiovisual effects of isochronous timing on visual perception and brain activity
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhs095
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhs095
Language: English
Additional information: © The Authors 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMCID: PMC3643713
Keywords: cross-modal, multisensory, neuroimaging, prediction, timing, Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Brain, Brain Mapping, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Oxygen, Photic Stimulation, Psychomotor Performance, Reaction Time, Signal Detection, Psychological, Time Factors, Time Perception, Visual Perception, Young Adult
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > IoN Central Administration
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1344931
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