UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Role of the lesion scar in the response to damage and repair of the central nervous system

Kawano, H; Kimura-Kuroda, J; Komuta, Y; Yoshioka, N; Li, HP; Kawamura, K; Li, Y; (2012) Role of the lesion scar in the response to damage and repair of the central nervous system. Cell and Tissue Research , 349 (1) pp. 169-180. 10.1007/s00441-012-1336-5. Green open access

[thumbnail of Li_Role of the lesion scar in the response to damage and repair of the central nervous system.pdf]
Preview
Text
Li_Role of the lesion scar in the response to damage and repair of the central nervous system.pdf

Download (683kB) | Preview

Abstract

Traumatic damage to the central nervous system (CNS) destroys the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and provokes the invasion of hematogenous cells into the neural tissue. Invading leukocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes secrete various cytokines that induce an inflammatory reaction in the injured CNS and result in local neural degeneration, formation of a cystic cavity and activation of glial cells around the lesion site. As a consequence of these processes, two types of scarring tissue are formed in the lesion site. One is a glial scar that consists in reactive astrocytes, reactive microglia and glial precursor cells. The other is a fibrotic scar formed by fibroblasts, which have invaded the lesion site from adjacent meningeal and perivascular cells. At the interface, the reactive astrocytes and the fibroblasts interact to form an organized tissue, the glia limitans. The astrocytic reaction has a protective role by reconstituting the BBB, preventing neuronal degeneration and limiting the spread of damage. While much attention has been paid to the inhibitory effects of the astrocytic component of the scars on axon regeneration, this review will cover a number of recent studies in which manipulations of the fibroblastic component of the scar by reagents, such as blockers of collagen synthesis have been found to be beneficial for axon regeneration. To what extent these changes in the fibroblasts act via subsequent downstream actions on the astrocytes remains for future investigation.

Type: Article
Title: Role of the lesion scar in the response to damage and repair of the central nervous system
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00441-012-1336-5
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-012-1336-5
Language: English
Additional information: This article is published with Open Access at Springerlink.com: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00441-012-1336-5.
Keywords: Animals, Axons, Central Nervous System, Cicatrix, Humans, Nerve Regeneration, Neuroglia, Wound Healing
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1343125
Downloads since deposit
70Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item