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Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality.

Currie, TE; Mace, R; (2012) Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality. Behav Brain Sci , 35 (2) 83 - 85. 10.1017/S0140525X11000963. Green open access

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Abstract

Re-analysis of the data provided in the target article reveals a lack of evidence for a strong, universal relationship between parasite stress and the variables relating to sociality. Furthermore, even if associations between these variables do exist, the analyses presented here do not provide evidence for Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) proposed causal mechanism.

Type: Article
Title: Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality.
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X11000963
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X11000963
Language: English
Additional information: © Cambridge University Press 2012
Keywords: Communicable Diseases, Family Relations, Humans, Parasitic Diseases, Religion and Psychology, Social Behavior, Stress, Psychological
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Anthropology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1339505
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