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Probabilistic methods for verbal autopsy interpretation: InterVA robustness in relation to variations in a priori probabilities.

Fottrell, E; Kahn, K; Tollman, S; Byass, P; (2011) Probabilistic methods for verbal autopsy interpretation: InterVA robustness in relation to variations in a priori probabilities. PLOS One , 6 (11) , Article e27200. 10.1371/journal.pone.0027200. Green open access

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Abstract

InterVA is a probabilistic method for interpreting verbal autopsy (VA) data. It uses a priori approximations of probabilities relating to diseases and symptoms to calculate the probability of specific causes of death given reported symptoms recorded in a VA interview. The extent to which InterVA's ability to characterise a population's mortality composition might be sensitive to variations in these a priori probabilities was investigated.

Type: Article
Title: Probabilistic methods for verbal autopsy interpretation: InterVA robustness in relation to variations in a priori probabilities.
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0027200
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0027200
Language: English
Additional information: © 2011 Fottrell et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.This work was undertaken with support from FAS, the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (grant 2006–1512) (www.fas.se). The Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance system, including conduct of verbal autopsies, is funded by The Wellcome Trust, UK (www.wellcome.ac.uk) (grant numbers 058893/Z/99/A, 069683/Z/02/Z and 085477/Z/08/Z) and the University of the Witwatersrand and Medical Research Council, South Africa. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Keywords: Autopsy, Cause of Death, Humans, Probability, Speech
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1331684
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