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Are empirically-supported therapies for bulimic symptoms associated with better self-rated outcomes than non-empirically supported therapies?

Van Schaick, R; (2011) Are empirically-supported therapies for bulimic symptoms associated with better self-rated outcomes than non-empirically supported therapies? Doctoral thesis , University College London. Green open access

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Abstract

Aim: To investigate whether engaging in empirically-supported psychological therapies (ESTs) is associated with improved self-rated treatment outcomes in clients with bulimia nervosa and related disorders (BN-RDs). Method: 98 people who had engaged in psychological therapy for BN-RD completed a questionnaire which assessed the recalled specific contents of their most recent set of psychological therapy and self-rated therapy outcomes. Results: Contrary to prediction, self-rated treatment outcomes did not differ between respondents who engaged in ESTs and non-ESTs, or between respondents who engaged in CBT judged as ‘adequate’ and CBT judged as ‘inadequate’. Respondents who engaged in a specialist form of CBT for bulimia nervosa (CBT-BN) reported greater improvement than those who engaged in standard CBT. Conclusions: The findings suggest that treatments that are labelled as ESTs are not necessarily perceived as more beneficial by clients with eating disorders than non-ESTs. However, there is some evidence that a specific evidence-based therapy (CBT-BN) led to better self-rated treatment outcomes than standard CBT.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Are empirically-supported therapies for bulimic symptoms associated with better self-rated outcomes than non-empirically supported therapies?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis in two volumes: volume 2 is restricted.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1329879
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