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Meanings in motion and faces: Developmental associations between the processing of intention from geometrical animations and gaze detection accuracy

Campbell, R; Lawrence, K; Mandy, W; Mitra, C; Jeyakuma, L; Skuse, D; (2006) Meanings in motion and faces: Developmental associations between the processing of intention from geometrical animations and gaze detection accuracy. DEV PSYCHOPATHOL , 18 (1) 99 - 118. 10.1017/S0954579406060068. Green open access

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Abstract

Aspects of face processing, on the one hand, and theory of mind (ToM) tasks, on the other hand, show specific impairment in autism. We aimed to discover whether a correlation between tasks tapping these abilities was evident in typically developing children at two developmental stages. One hundred fifty-four normal children (6-8 years and 16-18 years) and 13 high-IQ autistic children (11-17 years) were tested on a range of face-processing and IQ tasks, and a ToM test based oil the attribution of intentional movement to abstract shapes in a cartoon. By midchildhood, the ability accurately and spontaneously to infer the locus of attention of a face with direct or averted gaze was specifically associated with the ability to describe geometrical animations using mental state terms. Other face-processing and animation descriptions failed to show the association. Autistic adolescents were impaired at both gaze processing and ToM descriptions. using these tests. Mentalizing and gaze perception accuracy are associated in typically developing children and adolescents. The findings are congruent with the possibility that common neural Circuitry underlies, at least in part, processing implicated in these tasks. They are also congruent with the possibility that autism may lie at one end of a developmental continuum with respect to these skills, and to the factor(s) underpinning them.

Type: Article
Title: Meanings in motion and faces: Developmental associations between the processing of intention from geometrical animations and gaze detection accuracy
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0954579406060068
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579406060068
Language: English
Additional information: © 2006 Cambridge University Press
Keywords: ASPERGER-SYNDROME, EYE-GAZE, AUTISTIC INDIVIDUALS, FUNCTIONING AUTISM, MENTAL STATES, PERCEPTION, CHILDREN, MIND, RECOGNITION, BRAIN
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Experimental Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/11734
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