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Development and prioritisation of policy recommendations for medication safety improvement for intensive care units: a European Association of Hospital Pharmacists Special Interest Group Delphi Study

Howlett, Moninne; McCarthy, Suzanne; Silvari, Virginia; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Laaksonen, Raisa; (2024) Development and prioritisation of policy recommendations for medication safety improvement for intensive care units: a European Association of Hospital Pharmacists Special Interest Group Delphi Study. European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy 10.1136/ejhpharm-2023-004065. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Medication errors (MEs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the healthcare system. Patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) are potentially more susceptible to MEs due to severity of illness, the complexity of treatments they receive and the challenging nature of the ICU setting. The European Association of Hospital Pharmacists established a Special Interest Group (SIG) to undertake a programme of work to develop and prioritise recommendations to support medication safety improvement in ICUs across Europe. METHODS: Initial policy recommendations for medication safety within the ICU environment were developed following reviews of the literature and engagement with relevant stakeholders. A Delphi panel of 21 members of the SIG, that comprised healthcare professionals (HCPs) with expertise in ICU and/or medication safety, was convened in 2022. We conducted two rounds using a modified Delphi technique whereby participants anonymously ranked on a 9-point Likert Scale the policy recommendations according to their priority for implementation. RESULTS: In total, 32 policy recommendations were developed. In Delphi Round 1, 19 HCPs participated; consensus was achieved on most recommendations and partial consensus on six. In Delphi Round 2, 18 HCPs participated. After two Delphi rounds, consensus was achieved on all 32 recommendations. All recommendations were considered 'high priority' except one that was considered 'medium priority'. CONCLUSIONS: Through this study it was possible to develop and prioritise evidence-based policy recommendations to enhance medication safety, which may contribute to reducing MEs in ICUs across Europe. All recommendations were considered 'high priority' for implementation except one, indicating the perceived value of these recommendations in improving medication safety through preventing MEs in ICUs.

Type: Article
Title: Development and prioritisation of policy recommendations for medication safety improvement for intensive care units: a European Association of Hospital Pharmacists Special Interest Group Delphi Study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/ejhpharm-2023-004065
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ejhpharm-2023-004065
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: CRITICAL CARE, MEDICAL ERRORS, MEDICATION SYSTEMS, HOSPITAL, PHARMACY SERVICE, HOSPITAL, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Safety
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy > Practice and Policy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10191464
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