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Compassionate mind training for people with Parkinson's disease: A pilot study and predictors of response

Della Morte, Silvia; Berti, Elena; Lalli, Carolina; Modugno, Nicola; Morgante, Francesca; Schrag, Anette; Makovac, Elena; (2024) Compassionate mind training for people with Parkinson's disease: A pilot study and predictors of response. European Journal of Neurology , Article e16286. 10.1111/ene.16286. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Introduction: People with Parkinson's disease (PD) often present with disabling neuropsychiatric symptoms. Compassionate mind training (CMT) is a psychological approach effective in reducing stress and promoting psychological well-being. Heart rate variability (HRV), a measure reflecting sympathovagal balance, has been associated with psychological well-being and a compassionate attitude. // Aim: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of CMT in enhancing the quality of life and psychological well-being in PD patients. Additionally, we evaluated HRV as a physiomarker for assessing the CMT outcomes. // Methods: Twenty-four PD patients participated in the study. A 6-week online CMT intervention was delivered on a weekly basis. At baseline and post-intervention patients completed questionnaires assessing depression, anxiety and quality of life. In a subsample of 11 patients, HRV was measured at baseline and post-intervention in three conditions: at rest, during stress and after 3 min of deep breathing. // Results: The attendance rate was 94.3%. Quality of life and perceived stigma improved post-intervention as compared with baseline (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03 for PD Questionnaire-39 total score and Stigma subscore, respectively). After CMT, patients presented better physiological regulation to stress, as measured by higher HRV as compared with baseline (p = 0.005). Notably, patients who were more resilient to stress at baseline (less decrease in HRV during stress) experienced a more substantial reduction in anxiety and depression following CMT. // Conclusions: CMT is feasible and can improve quality of life and stigma in PD patients. HRV emerges as a promising physiomarker for predicting and measuring the outcomes of psychological interventions in PD.

Type: Article
Title: Compassionate mind training for people with Parkinson's disease: A pilot study and predictors of response
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/ene.16286
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ene.16286
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2024 The Authors. European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Neurology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Keywords: Compassion, heart rate variability, neuropsychiatric symptoms, Parkinson's disease, stigma
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10190324
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