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Practice patterns in reporting and documentation of Charles Bonnet syndrome: a retrospective review following COVID-19

Abdulhussein, Dalia; Jones, Lee; Dintakurti, Sri Harsha; Moosajee, Mariya; (2024) Practice patterns in reporting and documentation of Charles Bonnet syndrome: a retrospective review following COVID-19. Therapeutic Advances in Ophthalmology , 16 10.1177/25158414241232285. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is characterized by visual hallucinations occurring in people with visual impairment. CBS can negatively impact psychological well-being, and the COVID-19 pandemic period was associated with an exacerbation of symptoms.// Objectives: To compare clinical practice patterns and reporting of CBS at a tertiary eye care center between an interval prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and an interval during the pandemic.// Design: Retrospective chart review.// Methods: A search of electronic medical records for all suspected CBS cases was conducted between 1 March 2019 and 29 February 2020 (prior pandemic interval) and between 1 September 2020 and 29 August 2021 (peri-pandemic interval). Data retrieved from records included patient demographics, visual acuity at the time of CBS onset, type of hallucinations, reporting healthcare professional, management strategies and patient-reported impact of hallucinations.// Results: In total, 223 appointments referred to CBS in 156 patients at the prior interval, while 239 appointments referred to CBS in 155 patients at the peri-pandemic interval, representing 0.07% and 0.09% of all hospital attendance, respectively. Clinical subspecialty where CBS was most commonly reported was medical retina, and a greater proportion of patients at both time intervals were female. Types of hallucinations, management strategies and patient-reported impact were seldom reported, although documentation improved at the latter interval.// Conclusion: Practice patterns and patient characteristics were similar between the two intervals; however, subtle differences suggest a growing awareness of CBS. Targeted interventions in high-burden clinical subspecialties may encourage reporting and improve documentation of CBS.

Type: Article
Title: Practice patterns in reporting and documentation of Charles Bonnet syndrome: a retrospective review following COVID-19
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/25158414241232285
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/25158414241232285
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s), 2024. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Charles Bonnet syndrome, visual hallucinations
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10190300
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