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Place of the Hawks: Prehistoric, Roman and later activity at Hawkinge, Kent 1993–2006

Dawkes, Giles; Doherty, Anna; (2024) Place of the Hawks: Prehistoric, Roman and later activity at Hawkinge, Kent 1993–2006. Archaeology South‐East, UCL Institute of Archaeology: Portslade. Green open access

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Abstract

The six archaeological investigations published in this volume were excavated by Archaeology South-East (ASE; UCL Institute of Archaeology), in and around Hawkinge in south-east Kent, where work has been taking place since 1993. The study area is largely focussed on the site of the former aerodrome at Hawkinge, for which a major programme of redevelopment was proposed comprising both residential and industrial areas. Subsequently, further sites in the vicinity of Hawkinge were also proposed for redevelopment resulting in the six excavations presented in this volume. The sites were all located relatively close together, scattered across an area c 1.5km2. The historic village of Hawkinge is located less than a mile to the east of the modern, expanded town of Hawkinge. The large coastal town of Folkestone is located approximately 1km to the south. The excavations uncovered archaeological remains from a wide range of chronological periods, from the Neolithic to modern era. The majority of the activity identified relates to the prehistoric development of the landscape (mainly Bronze Age to Late Iron Age) and Romano-British settlement. A scatter of Mesolithic and early Neolithic flints was also uncovered evidencing an earlier presence in the landscape. The features excavated include a Bronze Age ring ditch, a number of cremation cemeteries of prehistoric and Roman date, as well as settlements comprising buildings, ovens and hearths, set within enclosures. The Late Iron Age-Roman funerary evidence was particularly significant comprising four different small cremation cemeteries, and several burials with ceramic containers and accessory vessels. One of the cremations was buried in a re-used amphora vessel, which is an increasingly recognised features of Roman funerary practice in Kent and south-east England more generally. Evidence for post-Roman activity was much more limited and comprised only a handful of features and finds, suggesting this area of Hawkinge was apparently left as open ground or pasture at this time. The original historic core of Hawkinge village developed on the higher ground c 800m to the east.

Type: Report
Title: Place of the Hawks: Prehistoric, Roman and later activity at Hawkinge, Kent 1993–2006
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.14324/000.rp.10189746
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology ASE
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10189746
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