UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Dyspnea (breathlessness) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: prevalence, progression, severity, and correlates

Young, Carolyn A; Chaouch, Amina; Mcdermott, Christopher J; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Chhetri, Suresh K; Talbot, Kevin; Harrower, Timothy; ... TONIC-ALS STUDY GROUP; + view all (2024) Dyspnea (breathlessness) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: prevalence, progression, severity, and correlates. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration 10.1080/21678421.2024.2322545. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Dyspnea  breathlessness  in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis motor neuron disease  prevalence  progression  severity  and correlates.pdf]
Preview
Text
Dyspnea breathlessness in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis motor neuron disease prevalence progression severity and correlates.pdf - Published Version

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: Dyspnea, or breathlessness, is an important symptom in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND). We examined the measurement properties of the Dyspnea-12. Methods: Rasch analysis enabled conversion of raw Dyspnea-12 scores to interval level metric equivalents. Converted data were used to perform trajectory modeling; those following different trajectories were compared for demographic, clinical, symptom, and functioning characteristics. Logistic regression examined differences between distinct trajectories. Results: In 1022 people, at baseline, mean metric Dyspnea-12 was 7.6 (SD 9.3). 49.8% had dyspnea, severe in 12.6%. Trajectory analysis over 28 months revealed three breathlessness trajectories: group 1 reported none at baseline/follow-up (42.7%); group 2 significantly increased over time (9.4%); group 3 had a much higher level at baseline which rose over follow-up (47.9%). Group 3 had worse outcomes on all symptoms, functioning and quality of life; compared to group 1, their odds of: respiratory onset sixfold greater; King’s stage ≥3 2.9 greater; increased odds of being bothered by choking, head drop, fasciculations, and muscle cramps; fatigue and anxiety also elevated (p < .01). Conclusion: Dyspnea is a cardinal symptom in ALS/MND and can be quickly measured using the Dyspnea-12. Raw scores can easily be converted to interval level measurement, for valid change scores and trajectory modeling. Dyspnea trajectories reveal different patterns, showing that clinical services must provide monitoring which is customized to individual patient need. Almost half of this large population had worsening dyspnea, confirming the importance of respiratory monitoring and interventions being integrated into routine ALS care.

Type: Article
Title: Dyspnea (breathlessness) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: prevalence, progression, severity, and correlates
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/21678421.2024.2322545
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/21678421.2024.2322545
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The terms on which this article has been published allow the posting of the Accepted Manuscript in a repository by the author(s) or with their consent.
Keywords: Dyspnea; breathlessness; Rasch; trajectories of outcome in neurological conditions-ALS; measure
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10189503
Downloads since deposit
4Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item