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Burden of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia in people with diabetes undergoing hemodialysis

Habte-Asres, Hellena Hailu; Jiang, Yutong; Rosenthal, Miranda; Wheeler, David Collins; (2024) Burden of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia in people with diabetes undergoing hemodialysis. BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care , 12 (1) , Article e003730. 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003730. Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) refers to a diminished capacity to detect hypoglycemia. IAH can result in severe and even life-threatening outcomes for individuals with diabetes, especially those in advanced stages of the disease. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of IAH in people with diabetes on hemodialysis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a single-center audit to assess the prevalence of IAH using the Clarke questionnaire. Simultaneously, we measured fear of hypoglycemia with an adapted version of the Hypoglycemia Survey and recorded the incidence of severe hypoglycemia. Data were presented as mean±SD or counts/percentages. Logistic regression was then employed to analyze the association between IAH and various sociodemographic and clinical factors. RESULTS: We included 56 participants with diabetes on hemodialysis, with a mean age of 67.2 years (±12.9), of whom 51.8% were male. The ethnic distribution was 23.2% white, 23.2% black, 19.6% Asian, and 33.9% unspecified. The mean HbA1c was 52 mmol/mol (±18.6). The majority (91.1%) had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and 55.4% of those were treated with insulin. The use of diabetes technology was low, with 2.8% of the participants using a continuous glucose monitor. IAH prevalence was 23.2%, and among the 57 participants, 23.6% had a history of severe hypoglycemia, and 60.6% reported fear of hypoglycemia. There were no significant differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between those with IAH and normal hypoglycemia awareness. CONCLUSIONS: We observed that 23.2% of individuals with diabetes undergoing hemodialysis had IAH. IAH was more prevalent in people who reported a fear of hypoglycemia and had a history of severe hypoglycemia episode. The study highlights the unmet needs and disparities in access to diabetes technology within this population.

Type: Article
Title: Burden of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia in people with diabetes undergoing hemodialysis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003730
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjdrc-2023-003730
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2024. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ. This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10187096
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