UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Size-dependence of food intake and mortality interact with temperature and seasonality to drive diversity in fish life histories

Kindsvater, Holly K; Juan-Jordá, Maria-José; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Horswill, Cat; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Mangel, Marc; (2024) Size-dependence of food intake and mortality interact with temperature and seasonality to drive diversity in fish life histories. Evolutionary Applications , 17 (2) , Article e13646. 10.1111/eva.13646. Green open access

[thumbnail of 2024 Kindsvater et al Evolutionary Applications.pdf]
Preview
Text
2024 Kindsvater et al Evolutionary Applications.pdf - Published Version

Download (6MB) | Preview

Abstract

Understanding how growth and reproduction will adapt to changing environmental conditions is a fundamental question in evolutionary ecology, but predicting the responses of specific taxa is challenging. Analyses of the physiological effects of climate change upon life history evolution rarely consider alternative hypothesized mechanisms, such as size-dependent foraging and the risk of predation, simultaneously shaping optimal growth patterns. To test for interactions between these mechanisms, we embedded a state-dependent energetic model in an ecosystem size-spectrum to ask whether prey availability (foraging) and risk of predation experienced by individual fish can explain observed diversity in life histories of fishes. We found that asymptotic growth emerged from size-based foraging and reproductive and mortality patterns in the context of ecosystem food web interactions. While more productive ecosystems led to larger body sizes, the effects of temperature on metabolic costs had only small effects on size. To validate our model, we ran it for abiotic scenarios corresponding to the ecological lifestyles of three tuna species, considering environments that included seasonal variation in temperature. We successfully predicted realistic patterns of growth, reproduction, and mortality of all three tuna species. We found that individuals grew larger when environmental conditions varied seasonally, and spawning was restricted to part of the year (corresponding to their migration from temperate to tropical waters). Growing larger was advantageous because foraging and spawning opportunities were seasonally constrained. This mechanism could explain the evolution of gigantism in temperate tunas. Our approach addresses variation in food availability and individual risk as well as metabolic processes and offers a promising approach to understand fish life-history responses to changing ocean conditions.

Type: Article
Title: Size-dependence of food intake and mortality interact with temperature and seasonality to drive diversity in fish life histories
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/eva.13646
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/eva.13646
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2024 The Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Body size, climate change, ecosystem size spectra, metabolic theory, state-dependent models
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10186837
Downloads since deposit
8Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item