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Outcome of Epilepsy Surgery in MRI-Negative Patients Without Histopathologic Abnormalities in the Resected Tissue

Sanders, Maurits W; Van der Wolf, Iskander; Jansen, Floor E; Aronica, Eleonora; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Racz, Attila; Surges, Rainer; ... as the European Epilepsy Brain Bank Consortium (EEBB); + view all (2024) Outcome of Epilepsy Surgery in MRI-Negative Patients Without Histopathologic Abnormalities in the Resected Tissue. Neurology , 102 (4) , Article e208007. 10.1212/WNL.0000000000208007. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Patients with presumed nonlesional focal epilepsy-based on either MRI or histopathologic findings-have a lower success rate of epilepsy surgery compared with lesional patients. In this study, we aimed to characterize a large group of patients with focal epilepsy who underwent epilepsy surgery despite a normal MRI and had no lesion on histopathology. Determinants of their postoperative seizure outcomes were further studied. METHODS: We designed an observational multicenter cohort study of MRI-negative and histopathology-negative patients who were derived from the European Epilepsy Brain Bank and underwent epilepsy surgery between 2000 and 2012 in 34 epilepsy surgery centers within Europe. We collected data on clinical characteristics, presurgical assessment, including genetic testing, surgery characteristics, postoperative outcome, and treatment regimen. RESULTS: Of the 217 included patients, 40% were seizure-free (Engel I) 2 years after surgery and one-third of patients remained seizure-free after 5 years. Temporal lobe surgery (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.62; 95% CI 1.19-5.76), shorter epilepsy duration (AOR for duration: 0.94; 95% CI 0.89-0.99), and completely normal histopathologic findings-versus nonspecific reactive gliosis-(AOR: 4.69; 95% CI 1.79-11.27) were significantly associated with favorable seizure outcome at 2 years after surgery. Of patients who underwent invasive monitoring, only 35% reached seizure freedom at 2 years. Patients with parietal lobe resections had lowest seizure freedom rates (12.5%). Among temporal lobe surgery patients, there was a trend toward favorable outcome if hippocampectomy was part of the resection strategy (OR: 2.94; 95% CI 0.98-8.80). Genetic testing was only sporadically performed. DISCUSSION: This study shows that seizure freedom can be reached in 40% of nonlesional patients with both normal MRI and histopathology findings. In particular, nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy should be regarded as a relatively favorable group, with almost half of patients achieving seizure freedom at 2 years after surgery-even more if the hippocampus is resected-compared with only 1 in 5 nonlesional patients who underwent extratemporal surgery. Patients with an electroclinically identified focus, who are nonlesional, will be a promising group for advanced molecular-genetic analysis of brain tissue specimens to identify new brain somatic epilepsy genes or epilepsy-associated molecular pathways.

Type: Article
Title: Outcome of Epilepsy Surgery in MRI-Negative Patients Without Histopathologic Abnormalities in the Resected Tissue
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000208007
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/wnl.0000000000208007
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2024 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND), which permits downloading and sharing the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH - Directors Office
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10186513
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