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What is the Minimal Clinically Important Difference in the One Minute Sit-to-Stand Test During Remote Interventions?

Che, Hio Man; McDonnell, Lynn; Pritchard, Lisa; Rand, Sarah; Shannon, Harriet; (2024) What is the Minimal Clinically Important Difference in the One Minute Sit-to-Stand Test During Remote Interventions? Journal of the Association for Chartered Physiotherapists in Respiratory Care , 56 (1) pp. 29-35. 10.56792/EEBG5278. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is the most effective therapeutic strategy to improve health status in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). With poor uptake and adherence to PR, a home-based rehabilitation programme could improve exercise capacity in these patients. A suitable outcome measure for home settings is required to assess such a programme’s effectiveness. Purpose: The one-minute sit-to-stand test (1-min STS) can easily be performed within home settings, and has been validated for other clinical scenarios. This service evaluation aimed to calculate the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for the 1-min STS following a remote exercise-based intervention. Methods: Anonymised data were analysed retrospectively from a comprehensive remote exercise-based intervention for patients with COPD. The 1-min STS, COPD Assessment Test and MRC dyspnoea scale were completed before and after the programme. Change in health status was recorded using the Global Rating of Change Questionnaire (GRCQ). Anchor-based methods were used to evaluate the MCID of the 1-min STS. Results: Data were available from 106 patients. The median (IQR) improvement in 1-min STS after the programme was three (1-5) repetitions. Changes in 1-min STS repetitions were non-significantly and only weakly correlated with changes in MRC dyspnoea scale, COPD Assessment Test and GRCQ (r=-0.15, -0.12 and 0.09, respectively). The estimated MCID for the 1-min STS was three repetitions. Conclusions: An improvement of at least three repetitions in the 1-min STS was considered meaningful in this service evaluation. Anchors that display stronger correlations would be required to increase the robustness of the MCID estimates.

Type: Article
Title: What is the Minimal Clinically Important Difference in the One Minute Sit-to-Stand Test During Remote Interventions?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.56792/EEBG5278
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.56792/EEBG5278
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10186162
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