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Common infections and neuroimaging markers of dementia in three UK cohort studies

Green, Rebecca E; Sudre, Carole H; Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Butt, Julia; Waterboer, Tim; Hughes, Alun D; Schott, Jonathan M; ... Williams, Dylan M; + view all (2024) Common infections and neuroimaging markers of dementia in three UK cohort studies. Alzheimer's & Dementia 10.1002/alz.13613. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: We aimed to investigate associations between common infections and neuroimaging markers of dementia risk (brain volume, hippocampal volume, white matter lesions) across three population-based studies. METHODS: We tested associations between serology measures (pathogen serostatus, cumulative burden, continuous antibody responses) and outcomes using linear regression, including adjustments for total intracranial volume and scanner/clinic information (basic model), age, sex, ethnicity, education, socioeconomic position, alcohol, body mass index, and smoking (fully adjusted model). Interactions between serology measures and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype were tested. Findings were meta-analyzed across cohorts (Nmain  = 2632; NAPOE-interaction  = 1810). RESULTS: Seropositivity to John Cunningham virus associated with smaller brain volumes in basic models (β = -3.89 mL [-5.81, -1.97], Padjusted  < 0.05); these were largely attenuated in fully adjusted models (β = -1.59 mL [-3.55, 0.36], P = 0.11). No other relationships were robust to multiple testing corrections and sensitivity analyses, but several suggestive associations were observed. DISCUSSION: We did not find clear evidence for relationships between common infections and markers of dementia risk. Some suggestive findings warrant testing for replication.

Type: Article
Title: Common infections and neuroimaging markers of dementia in three UK cohort studies
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/alz.13613
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/alz.13613
Language: English
Additional information: © 2024 The Authors. Alzheimer's & Dementia published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Alzheimer's Association. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, cerebral small vessel disease, common infections, dementia, multiplex serology, pathogen burden
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10186121
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