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Adaptive Long-Read Sequencing Reveals GGC Repeat Expansion in ZFHX3 Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 4

Chen, Z; Gustavsson, EK; Macpherson, H; Anderson, C; Clarkson, C; Rocca, C; Self, E; ... Ptáček, LJ; + view all (2024) Adaptive Long-Read Sequencing Reveals GGC Repeat Expansion in ZFHX3 Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 4. Movement Disorders 10.1002/mds.29704. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Spinocerebellar ataxia type 4 (SCA4) is an autosomal dominant ataxia with invariable sensory neuropathy originally described in a family with Swedish ancestry residing in Utah more than 25 years ago. Despite tight linkage to the 16q22 region, the molecular diagnosis has since remained elusive. Objectives: Inspired by pathogenic structural variation implicated in other 16q-ataxias with linkage to the same locus, we revisited the index SCA4 cases from the Utah family using novel technologies to investigate structural variation within the candidate region. Methods: We adopted a targeted long-read sequencing approach with adaptive sampling on the Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) platform that enables the detection of segregating structural variants within a genomic region without a priori assumptions about any variant features. Results: Using this approach, we found a heterozygous (GGC)n repeat expansion in the last coding exon of the zinc finger homeobox 3 (ZFHX3) gene that segregates with disease, ranging between 48 and 57 GGC repeats in affected probands. This finding was replicated in a separate family with SCA4. Furthermore, the estimation of this GGC repeat size in short-read whole genome sequencing (WGS) data of 21,836 individuals recruited to the 100,000 Genomes Project in the UK and our in-house dataset of 11,258 exomes did not reveal any pathogenic repeats, indicating that the variant is ultrarare. Conclusions: These findings support the utility of adaptive long-read sequencing as a powerful tool to decipher causative structural variation in unsolved cases of inherited neurological disease. © 2024 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Type: Article
Title: Adaptive Long-Read Sequencing Reveals GGC Repeat Expansion in ZFHX3 Associated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 4
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/mds.29704
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.29704
Language: English
Additional information: © 2024 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: ataxia, long-read sequencing, repeat expansion disorder
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Genetics and Genomic Medicine Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10185508
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