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Genomic and panproteomic analysis of the development of infant immune responses to antigenically-diverse pneumococci

Croucher, Nicholas J; Campo, Joseph J; Le, Timothy Q; Pablo, Jozelyn V; Hung, Christopher; Teng, Andy A; Turner, Claudia; ... Goldblatt, David; + view all (2024) Genomic and panproteomic analysis of the development of infant immune responses to antigenically-diverse pneumococci. Nature Communications , 15 (1) , Article 355. 10.1038/s41467-023-44584-2. Green open access

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Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a nasopharyngeal commensal and respiratory pathogen. This study characterises the immunoglobulin G (IgG) repertoire recognising pneumococci from birth to 24 months old (mo) in a prospectively-sampled cohort of 63 children using a panproteome array. IgG levels are highest at birth, due to transplacental transmission of maternal antibodies. The subsequent emergence of responses to individual antigens exhibit distinct kinetics across the cohort. Stable differences in the strength of individuals' responses, correlating with maternal IgG concentrations, are established by 6 mo. By 12 mo, children develop unique antibody profiles that are boosted by re-exposure. However, some proteins only stimulate substantial responses in adults. Integrating genomic data on nasopharyngeal colonisation demonstrates rare pneumococcal antigens can elicit strong IgG levels post-exposure. Quantifying such responses to the diverse core loci (DCL) proteins is complicated by cross-immunity between variants. In particular, the conserved N terminus of DCL protein zinc metalloprotease B provokes the strongest early IgG responses. DCL proteins' ability to inhibit mucosal immunity likely explains continued pneumococcal carriage despite hosts' polyvalent antibody repertoire. Yet higher IgG levels are associated with reduced incidence, and severity, of pneumonia, demonstrating the importance of the heterogeneity in response strength and kinetics across antigens and individuals.

Type: Article
Title: Genomic and panproteomic analysis of the development of infant immune responses to antigenically-diverse pneumococci
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-023-44584-2
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-023-44584-2
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Bacterial host response, Bacterial infection, Prokaryote
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10185346
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