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The impact of a diabetes diagnosis on health and well-being: Findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

Kristensen, CB; Chilcot, J; Jackson, SE; Steptoe, A; Hackett, RA; (2023) The impact of a diabetes diagnosis on health and well-being: Findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Journal of Diabetes 10.1111/1753-0407.13518. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Poorer health and well-being are associated with diabetes risk. However, little is known about the trajectory of health and well-being from before to after diabetes diagnosis. We compared depressive symptoms, quality of life, self-rated health, and loneliness at three time points (prediagnosis, diagnosis, 2–4 years post diagnosis) in individuals who developed diabetes and a comparison group. Methods: Health and well-being measures were self-reported by 3474 participants from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Repeated measures analysis of variance and generalized estimating equations were used to investigate differences by group, time, and group-by-time interactions. Results: A total of 473 (13.6%) participants developed diabetes. The diabetes group reported greater depressive symptoms (W2(1) = 20.67, p <.001) and lower quality of life (F = 1, 2535 = 10.30, p =.001) and were more likely to rate their health as fair/poor (W2(1) = 67.11, p <.001) across time points, adjusting for age, sex, and wealth. They also reported greater loneliness (F = 1, 2693 = 9.70, p =.002) in unadjusted analyses. However, this was attenuated to the null in adjusted analyses. The group-by-time interaction was significant for quality of life (F = 1.97, 5003.58 = 5.60, p =.004) and self-rated health (W2(2) = 11.69, p =.003), with a greater decline in these measures over time in the diabetes group in adjusted analyses. Conclusion: People who received a diabetes diagnosis had greater depressive symptoms, lower quality of life, and poorer self-rated health than those who did not develop diabetes. Quality of life and self-rated health deteriorated more rapidly following a diagnosis. Screening for these factors around the time of diagnosis could allow for interventions to improve the health and well-being of those with diabetes.

Type: Article
Title: The impact of a diabetes diagnosis on health and well-being: Findings from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing
Location: Australia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/1753-0407.13518
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1753-0407.13518
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2023 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes published by Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.
Keywords: diabetes, diagnosis, health, quality of life, well-being
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10184795
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