UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Examining acute psychopharmacological effects of nicotine vaping versus heated tobacco products in a randomised crossover study of product naïve adult smokers

Kale, Dimitra; Tattan-Birch, Harry; Brown, Jamie; Cox, Sharon; Dawkins, Lynne; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Morris, Kierra; (2023) Examining acute psychopharmacological effects of nicotine vaping versus heated tobacco products in a randomised crossover study of product naïve adult smokers. Scientific Reports , 13 , Article 22676. 10.1038/s41598-023-49602-3. Green open access

[thumbnail of Brown_s41598-023-49602-3.pdf]
Preview
Text
Brown_s41598-023-49602-3.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

Nicotine vaping products (NVPs) and heated tobacco products (HTPs) are designed to replicate the sensory and behavioural aspects of smoking cigarettes while avoiding combustion. The success of these products as harm reduction tools will partially depend on their ability to satisfy smokers and alleviate nicotine-related withdrawal symptoms. This study aims to compare short-term effects of NVPs (Juul and Aspire PockeX) versus HTPs (IQOS) on smoking-related withdrawal relief, product satisfaction, intention to switch to NVP/HTP, perceptions and attitudes in UK adult cigarette smokers naïve to these products. In a randomized cross-over study, 45 participants visited the lab twice, at each visit trying one of the two products (NVP/HTP) and completing a questionnaire. Responses were normalized on a 0–100% scale and mean differences (MD) between NVP and HTP scores computed, with positive and negative MD values indicating greater endorsement for NVP and HTP, respectively. Cigarette cravings were reduced similarly (~ 20.0%) by both products (MD = 4.5%, 95%Confidence Interval (CI) − 4.8, 13.8). Direct positive effects (MD = − 3.5%, 95%CI − 7.2, 0.2) and adverse side effects (MD = 1.8%, 95%CI − 0.3, 3.8) were comparable after each product use, though marginally favouring HTPs. HTPs were perceived as more satisfying overall (MD = − 13.2%, 95%CI − 20.3 − 6.1) than NVPs but both were perceived as similarly addictive (MD = 3.6%, 95%CI − 4.6, 11.8), relative to cigarettes. Intention to switch to either product was comparable (MD = 4.0%, 95%CI − 5.7, 13.8). Comparison of acute use of NVP versus HTP in a sample of UK smokers naïve to these products suggests that HTPs are perceived as more satisfying than NVPs, though still less satisfying than cigarettes.

Type: Article
Title: Examining acute psychopharmacological effects of nicotine vaping versus heated tobacco products in a randomised crossover study of product naïve adult smokers
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-023-49602-3
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-023-49602-3
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10184201
Downloads since deposit
7Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item