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Understanding the tuberculosis granuloma: the matrix revolutions

Elkington, P; Polak, ME; Reichmann, MT; Leslie, A; (2022) Understanding the tuberculosis granuloma: the matrix revolutions. Trends in Molecular Medicine , 28 (2) pp. 143-154. 10.1016/j.molmed.2021.11.004. Green open access

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Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) causes the human disease tuberculosis (TB) and remains the top global infectious pandemic after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Furthermore, TB has killed many more humans than any other pathogen, after prolonged coevolution to optimise its pathogenic strategies. Full understanding of fundamental disease processes in humans is necessary to successfully combat this highly successful pathogen. While the importance of immunodeficiency has been long recognised, biologic therapies and unbiased approaches are providing unprecedented insights into the intricacy of the host–pathogen interaction. The nature of a protective response is more complex than previously hypothesised. Here, we integrate recent evidence from human studies and unbiased approaches to consider how Mtb causes human TB and highlight the recurring theme of extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover.

Type: Article
Title: Understanding the tuberculosis granuloma: the matrix revolutions
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.molmed.2021.11.004
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molmed.2021.11.004
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the version of record. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: bioinformatic analysis, extracellular matrix, granuloma, metalloprotease, tuberculosis, COVID-19, Granuloma, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, SARS-CoV-2, Tuberculosis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10183808
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