UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of cannabis use disorder yields insight into disease biology and public health implications

Levey, Daniel F; Galimberti, Marco; Deak, Joseph D; Wendt, Frank R; Bhattacharya, Arjun; Koller, Dora; Harrington, Kelly M; ... Gelernter, Joel; + view all (2023) Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of cannabis use disorder yields insight into disease biology and public health implications. Nature Genetics 10.1038/s41588-023-01563-z. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Biradar_Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of cannabis use disorder yields insight into disease biology and public health implications_VoR.pdf]
Preview
Text
Biradar_Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of cannabis use disorder yields insight into disease biology and public health implications_VoR.pdf - Published Version

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

As recreational use of cannabis is being decriminalized in many places and medical use widely sanctioned, there are growing concerns about increases in cannabis use disorder (CanUD), which is associated with numerous medical comorbidities. Here we performed a genome-wide association study of CanUD in the Million Veteran Program (MVP), followed by meta-analysis in 1,054,365 individuals (ncases = 64,314) from four broad ancestries designated by the reference panel used for assignment (European n = 886,025, African n = 123,208, admixed American n = 38,289 and East Asian n = 6,843). Population-specific methods were applied to calculate single nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability within each ancestry. Statistically significant single nucleotide polymorphism-based heritability for CanUD was observed in all but the smallest population (East Asian). We discovered genome-wide significant loci unique to each ancestry: 22 in European, 2 each in African and East Asian, and 1 in admixed American ancestries. A genetically informed causal relationship analysis indicated a possible effect of genetic liability for CanUD on lung cancer risk, suggesting potential unanticipated future medical and psychiatric public health consequences that require further study to disentangle from other known risk factors such as cigarette smoking.

Type: Article
Title: Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of cannabis use disorder yields insight into disease biology and public health implications
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41588-023-01563-z
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41588-023-01563-z
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Behavioural genetics; Genome-wide association studies
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10182484
Downloads since deposit
4Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item