UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Psychosocial Implications of Homophobia and HIV Stigma in Social Support Networks: Insights for High-Impact HIV Prevention Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men

Garcia, J; Parker, C; Parker, RG; Wilson, PA; Philbin, M; Hirsch, JS; (2016) Psychosocial Implications of Homophobia and HIV Stigma in Social Support Networks: Insights for High-Impact HIV Prevention Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men. Health Education and Behavior , 43 (2) pp. 217-225. 10.1177/1090198115599398. Green open access

[thumbnail of Garcia_Psychosocial Implications of Homophobia and HIV Stigma in Social Support Networks- Insights for High-Impact HIV Prevention Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.pdf]
Preview
Text
Garcia_Psychosocial Implications of Homophobia and HIV Stigma in Social Support Networks- Insights for High-Impact HIV Prevention Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men.pdf - Published Version

Download (85kB) | Preview

Abstract

Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) bear an increasingly disproportionate burden of HIV in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends high-impact combination prevention for populations at high risk for HIV infection, such as BMSM. However, few scholars have considered the types of behavioral interventions that combined with biomedical prevention could prove effective for mitigating the epidemic among BMSM. Between June 2013 and May 2014, we conducted three in-depth interviews each with 31 BMSM, interviews with 17 community stakeholders, and participant observation in New York City to understand the sociocultural and structural factors that may affect the acceptance of and adherence to oral preexposure prophylaxis among BMSM and to inform an adherence clinical trial. BMSM and community leaders frequently described condomless sex as a consequence of psychosocial factors and economic circumstances stemming from internalized homophobia resulting from rejection by families and religious groups. BMSM revealed that internalized homophobia and HIV stigma resulted in perceived lack of self- and community efficacy in accepting and adhering to preexposure prophylaxis. Our results indicate that addressing internalized homophobia and fostering emotional social support in peer networks are key elements to improve the effectiveness of combination prevention among BMSM.

Type: Article
Title: Psychosocial Implications of Homophobia and HIV Stigma in Social Support Networks: Insights for High-Impact HIV Prevention Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/1090198115599398
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/1090198115599398
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: HIV/AIDS; Combination Prevention; Black MSM; Social Support; Pre-exposure Prophylaxis
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Dept of Anthropology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10181755
Downloads since deposit
9Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item