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Increased paclitaxel recovery from Taxus baccata vascular stem cells using novel in situ product recovery approaches

Santoyo-Garcia, JH; Valdivia-Cabrera, M; Ochoa-Villarreal, M; Casasola-Zamora, S; Ripoll, M; Escrich, A; Moyano, E; ... Rios-Solis, L; + view all (2023) Increased paclitaxel recovery from Taxus baccata vascular stem cells using novel in situ product recovery approaches. Bioresources and Bioprocessing , 10 , Article 68. 10.1186/s40643-023-00687-8. Green open access

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Abstract

In this study, several approaches were tested to optimise the production and recovery of the widely used anticancer drug Taxol® (paclitaxel) from culturable vascular stem cells (VSCs) of Taxus baccata, which is currently used as a successful cell line for paclitaxel production. An in situ product recovery (ISPR) technique was employed, which involved combining three commercial macro-porous resin beads (HP-20, XAD7HP and HP-2MG) with batch and semi-continuous cultivations of the T. baccata VSCs after adding methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) as an elicitor. The optimal resin combination resulted in 234 ± 23 mg of paclitaxel per kg of fresh-weight cells, indicating a 13-fold improved yield compared to the control (with no resins) in batch cultivation. This resin treatment was further studied to evaluate the resins’ removal capacity of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can cause poor cell growth or reduce product synthesis. It was observed that the ISPR cultivations had fourfold less intracellular ROS concentration than that of the control; thus, a reduced ROS concentration established by the resin contributed to increased paclitaxel yield, contrary to previous studies. These paclitaxel yields are the highest reported to date using VSCs, and this scalable production method could be applied for a diverse range of similar compounds utilising plant cell culture. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

Type: Article
Title: Increased paclitaxel recovery from Taxus baccata vascular stem cells using novel in situ product recovery approaches
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s40643-023-00687-8
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s40643-023-00687-8
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Paclitaxel, In situ product recovery, Vascular stem cells, Taxus baccata, Reactive oxygen species
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Biochemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10181430
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