UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Natural killer cell responses during SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination in people living with HIV-1

Alrubayyi, Aljawharah; Touizer, Emma; Hameiri-Bowen, Dan; Charlton, Bethany; Gea-Mallorquí, Ester; Hussain, Noshin; da Costa, Kelly AS; ... Peppa, Dimitra; + view all (2023) Natural killer cell responses during SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination in people living with HIV-1. Scientific Reports , 13 (1) , Article 18994. 10.1038/s41598-023-45412-9. Green open access

[thumbnail of s41598-023-45412-9.pdf]
Preview
PDF
s41598-023-45412-9.pdf - Published Version

Download (2MB) | Preview

Abstract

Natural killer (NK) cell subsets with adaptive properties are emerging as regulators of vaccine-induced T and B cell responses and are specialized towards antibody-dependent functions contributing to SARS-CoV-2 control. Although HIV-1 infection is known to affect the NK cell pool, the additional impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or vaccination on NK cell responses in people living with HIV (PLWH) has remained unexplored. Our data show that SARS-CoV-2 infection skews NK cells towards a more differentiated/adaptive CD57+FcεRIγ- phenotype in PLWH. A similar subset was induced following vaccination in SARS-CoV-2 naïve PLWH in addition to a CD56bright population with cytotoxic potential. Antibody-dependent NK cell function showed robust and durable responses to Spike up to 148 days post-infection, with responses enriched in adaptive NK cells. NK cell responses were further boosted by the first vaccine dose in SARS-CoV-2 exposed individuals and peaked after the second dose in SARS-CoV-2 naïve PLWH. The presence of adaptive NK cells associated with the magnitude of cellular and humoral responses. These data suggest that features of adaptive NK cells can be effectively engaged to complement and boost vaccine-induced adaptive immunity in potentially more vulnerable groups such as PLWH.

Type: Article
Title: Natural killer cell responses during SARS-CoV-2 infection and vaccination in people living with HIV-1
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-023-45412-9
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-023-45412-9
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 Springer Nature Limited. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Humans, COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, HIV-1, Vaccination, Killer Cells, Natural, Antibodies, Vaccines, HIV Infections, Antibodies, Viral
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10180944
Downloads since deposit
7Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item