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Bi-allelic truncating variants in CASP2 underlie a neurodevelopmental disorder with lissencephaly

Uctepe, Eyyup; Vona, Barbara; Esen, Fatma Nisa; Sonmez, F Mujgan; Smol, Thomas; Tümer, Sait; Mancılar, Hanifenur; ... Yesilyurt, Ahmet; + view all (2023) Bi-allelic truncating variants in CASP2 underlie a neurodevelopmental disorder with lissencephaly. European Journal of Human Genetics 10.1038/s41431-023-01461-2. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Lissencephaly (LIS) is a malformation of cortical development due to deficient neuronal migration and abnormal formation of cerebral convolutions or gyri. Thirty-one LIS-associated genes have been previously described. Recently, biallelic pathogenic variants in CRADD and PIDD1, have associated with LIS impacting the previously established role of the PIDDosome in activating caspase-2. In this report, we describe biallelic truncating variants in CASP2, another subunit of PIDDosome complex. Seven patients from five independent families presenting with a neurodevelopmental phenotype were identified through GeneMatcher-facilitated international collaborations. Exome sequencing analysis was carried out and revealed two distinct novel homozygous (NM_032982.4:c.1156delT (p.Tyr386ThrfsTer25), and c.1174 C > T (p.Gln392Ter)) and compound heterozygous variants (c.[130 C > T];[876 + 1 G > T] p.[Arg44Ter];[?]) in CASP2 segregating within the families in a manner compatible with an autosomal recessive pattern. RNA studies of the c.876 + 1 G > T variant indicated usage of two cryptic splice donor sites, each introducing a premature stop codon. All patients from whom brain MRIs were available had a typical fronto-temporal LIS and pachygyria, remarkably resembling the CRADD and PIDD1-related neuroimaging findings. Other findings included developmental delay, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, hypotonia, seizure, poor social skills, and autistic traits. In summary, we present patients with CASP2-related ID, anterior-predominant LIS, and pachygyria similar to previously reported patients with CRADD and PIDD1-related disorders, expanding the genetic spectrum of LIS and lending support that each component of the PIDDosome complex is critical for normal development of the human cerebral cortex and brain function.

Type: Article
Title: Bi-allelic truncating variants in CASP2 underlie a neurodevelopmental disorder with lissencephaly
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41431-023-01461-2
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41431-023-01461-2
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10180733
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