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Polygenic predisposition, sleep duration, and depression: evidence from a prospective population-based cohort

Hamilton, Odessa S; Steptoe, Andrew; Ajnakina, Olesya; (2023) Polygenic predisposition, sleep duration, and depression: evidence from a prospective population-based cohort. Translational Psychiatry , 13 , Article 323. 10.1038/s41398-023-02622-z. Green open access

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Abstract

Suboptimal sleep durations and depression frequently cooccur. Short-sleep and long-sleep are commonly thought of as symptoms of depression, but a growing literature suggests that they may be prodromal. While each represents a process of mutual influence, the directionality between them remains unclear. Using polygenic scores (PGS), we investigate the prospective direction involved in suboptimal sleep durations and depression. Male and female participants, aged ≥50, were recruited from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). PGS for sleep duration, short-sleep, and long-sleep were calculated using summary statistics data from the UK Biobank cohort. Sleep duration, categorised into short-sleep (“≤5 h”), optimal-sleep (“>5 to <9 h”), and long-sleep (“≥9 h”), was measured at baseline and across an average 8-year follow-up. Subclinical depression (Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale [≥4 of 7]) was also ascertained at baseline and across an average 8-year follow-up. One standard deviation increase in PGS for short-sleep was associated with 14% higher odds of depression onset (95% CI = 1.03–1.25, p = 0.008). However, PGS for sleep duration (OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.84–1.00, p = 0.053) and long-sleep (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.89–1.06, p = 0.544) were not associated with depression onset during follow-up. During the same period, PGS for depression was not associated with overall sleep duration, short-sleep, or long-sleep. Polygenic predisposition to short-sleep was associated with depression onset over an average 8-year period. However, polygenic predisposition to depression was not associated with overall sleep duration, short-sleep or long-sleep, suggesting different mechanisms underlie the relationship between depression and the subsequent onset of suboptimal sleep durations in older adults.

Type: Article
Title: Polygenic predisposition, sleep duration, and depression: evidence from a prospective population-based cohort
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41398-023-02622-z
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-023-02622-z
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Depression, Genetics, Physiology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10179823
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