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2D sodium MRI of the human calf using half-sinc excitation pulses and compressed sensing

Baker, Rebecca R; Muthurangu, Vivek; Rega, Marilena; Montalt-Tordera, Javier; Rot, Samuel; Solanky, Bhavana S; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia AM; ... Steeden, Jennifer A; + view all (2023) 2D sodium MRI of the human calf using half-sinc excitation pulses and compressed sensing. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 10.1002/mrm.29841. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Sodium MRI can be used to quantify tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in vivo; however, UTE sequences are required to capture the rapidly decaying signal. 2D MRI enables high in-plane resolution but typically has long TEs. Half-sinc excitation may enable UTE; however, twice as many readouts are necessary. Scan time can be minimized by reducing the number of signal averages (NSAs), but at a cost to SNR. We propose using compressed sensing (CS) to accelerate 2D half-sinc acquisitions while maintaining SNR and TSC. METHODS: Ex vivo and in vivo TSC were compared between 2D spiral sequences with full-sinc (TE = 0.73 ms, scan time ≈ 5 min) and half-sinc excitation (TE = 0.23 ms, scan time ≈ 10 min), with 150 NSAs. Ex vivo, these were compared to a reference 3D sequence (TE = 0.22 ms, scan time ≈ 24 min). To investigate shortening 2D scan times, half-sinc data was retrospectively reconstructed with fewer NSAs, comparing a nonuniform fast Fourier transform to CS. Resultant TSC and image quality were compared to reference 150 NSAs nonuniform fast Fourier transform images. RESULTS: TSC was significantly higher from half-sinc than from full-sinc acquisitions, ex vivo and in vivo. Ex vivo, half-sinc data more closely matched the reference 3D sequence, indicating improved accuracy. In silico modeling confirmed this was due to shorter TEs minimizing bias caused by relaxation differences between phantoms and tissue. CS was successfully applied to in vivo, half-sinc data, maintaining TSC and image quality (estimated SNR, edge sharpness, and qualitative metrics) with ≥50 NSAs. CONCLUSION: 2D sodium MRI with half-sinc excitation and CS was validated, enabling TSC quantification with 2.25 × 2.25 mm2 resolution and scan times of ≤5 mins.

Type: Article
Title: 2D sodium MRI of the human calf using half-sinc excitation pulses and compressed sensing
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/mrm.29841
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.29841
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: 23Na MRI, UTE, compressed sensing, half-sinc, sodium
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Childrens Cardiovascular Disease
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Department of Imaging
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10178582
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