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The impact of age-relevant and generic infographics on knowledge, attitudes and intention to attend cervical screening: A randomized controlled trial

Waite, Frances; Marlow, Laura AV; Nemec, Martin; Waller, Jo; (2023) The impact of age-relevant and generic infographics on knowledge, attitudes and intention to attend cervical screening: A randomized controlled trial. British Journal of Health Psychology 10.1111/bjhp.12695. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Cervical screening uptake in England is falling. Infographics could strengthen intention to attend, increase positive attitudes and improve knowledge. Age targeting could improve these outcomes further. We tested the impact of generic and age-targeted infographics. DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial using an age-stratified, parallel-group design. METHODS: Women aged 25-64 (n = 2095) were recruited through an online panel and randomized to see one of the three infographics. We tested: (i) impact of a generic cervical screening infographic compared to a control infographic on an unrelated topic with all screening age women and (ii) impact of an age-targeted infographic compared to a generic cervical screening infographic with older women (50-64 years). Intentions, knowledge and attitudes were measured. RESULTS: Women aged 25-64 years who viewed the generic infographic had significantly higher intentions [F(1, 1513) = 6.14, p = .013, η p 2 $$ {\eta}_p^2 $$  = .004], more accurate beliefs about the timeline of cervical cancer development (OR: 5.18, 95% CI: 3.86-6.95), more accurate social norms (OR: 3.03, 95% CI: 2.38-3.87) and more positive beliefs about screening benefits (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.52-3.28) than those viewing the control infographic. In the older age group, there was no significant difference in intention between those viewing the generic versus age-targeted versions [F(1, 607) = .03, p = .853, η p 2 $$ {\eta}_p^2 $$  < .001], but the age-targeted version was more engaging [F(1, 608) = 9.41, p = .002, η p 2 $$ {\eta}_p^2 $$  = .015]. CONCLUSIONS: A cervical screening infographic can result in more positive attitudes and better knowledge and may have a small impact on intentions. Although age targeting did not affect intention, it had a positive impact on engagement and may therefore be useful in encouraging women to read and process materials.

Type: Article
Title: The impact of age-relevant and generic infographics on knowledge, attitudes and intention to attend cervical screening: A randomized controlled trial
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/bjhp.12695
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjhp.12695
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2023 The Authors. British Journal of Health Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: RCT, cervical cancer, infographic, intervention, screening intention, targeting
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10178301
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