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The value of Augmented Reality in surgery — A usability study on laparoscopic liver surgery

Ramalhinho, João; Yoo, Soojeong; Dowrick, Thomas; Koo, Bongjin; Somasundaram, Murali; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Hawkes, David J; ... Clarkson, Matthew J; + view all (2023) The value of Augmented Reality in surgery — A usability study on laparoscopic liver surgery. Medical Image Analysis , 90 , Article 102943. 10.1016/j.media.2023.102943. Green open access

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Abstract

Augmented Reality (AR) is considered to be a promising technology for the guidance of laparoscopic liver surgery. By overlaying pre-operative 3D information of the liver and internal blood vessels on the laparoscopic view, surgeons can better understand the location of critical structures. In an effort to enable AR, several authors have focused on the development of methods to obtain an accurate alignment between the laparoscopic video image and the pre-operative 3D data of the liver, without assessing the benefit that the resulting overlay can provide during surgery. In this paper, we present a study that aims to assess quantitatively and qualitatively the value of an AR overlay in laparoscopic surgery during a simulated surgical task on a phantom setup. We design a study where participants are asked to physically localise pre-operative tumours in a liver phantom using three image guidance conditions — a baseline condition without any image guidance, a condition where the 3D surfaces of the liver are aligned to the video and displayed on a black background, and a condition where video see-through AR is displayed on the laparoscopic video. Using data collected from a cohort of 24 participants which include 12 surgeons, we observe that compared to the baseline, AR decreases the median localisation error of surgeons on non-peripheral targets from 25.8 mm to 9.2 mm. Using subjective feedback, we also identify that AR introduces usability improvements in the surgical task and increases the perceived confidence of the users. Between the two tested displays, the majority of participants preferred to use the AR overlay instead of navigated view of the 3D surfaces on a separate screen. We conclude that AR has the potential to improve performance and decision making in laparoscopic surgery, and that improvements in overlay alignment accuracy and depth perception should be pursued in the future.

Type: Article
Title: The value of Augmented Reality in surgery — A usability study on laparoscopic liver surgery
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.media.2023.102943
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.media.2023.102943
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Augmented reality; Image-guided surgery; Usability; Laparoscopic surgery
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > UCL Interaction Centre
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10177899
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