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Hepatic steatosis in people older and younger than fifty who are living with HIV and HIV-negative controls: A cross-sectional study nested within the POPPY cohort

Arenas-Pinto, A; Bakewell, N; Milinkovic, A; Williams, I; Vera, J; Post, FA; Anderson, J; ... Sabin, CA; + view all (2023) Hepatic steatosis in people older and younger than fifty who are living with HIV and HIV-negative controls: A cross-sectional study nested within the POPPY cohort. HIV Medicine 10.1111/hiv.13540. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hepatic steatosis is a major cause of chronic liver disease associated with several negative health outcomes. We compared the prevalence of and factors associated with steatosis in people living with and without HIV. METHODS: Older (>50 years) and younger (<50 years) people with HIV and older HIV-negative controls (>50 years) underwent liver transient elastography examination with controlled attenuation parameter (steatosis ≥238 dB/m, moderate/severe steatosis ≥280 dB/m, liver fibrosis ≥7.1 kPa). We compared groups using logistic regression/Chi-squared/Fisher's exact/Kruskal–Wallis tests. RESULTS: In total, 317 participants (109 older people with HIV; 101 younger people with HIV; 107 HIV-negative controls) were predominantly white (86%) and male (76%), and 21% were living with obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2). Most (97%) people with HIV had undetectable HIV RNA. The prevalence of fibrosis was 8.4%, 3.0%, and 6.5% in the three groups, respectively (p = 0.26). Fibrosis was predominately (>65%) mild. The prevalence of steatosis was the same in older people with HIV (66.4%) and controls (66.4%) but lower in younger people with HIV (37.4%; p < 0.001). After adjustment, younger people with HIV were less likely to have steatosis (odds ratio [OR] 0.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14–0.52) than controls, but male sex (OR 2.45; 95% CI 1.20–4.50) and high waist-to-hip ratio (OR 3.04; 95% CI 1.74–5.33) were associated with an increased odds of steatosis. We found no association between steatosis and HIV-related variables. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis was similar between older participants regardless of HIV status. Age, sex, and abdominal obesity, but not HIV-related variables, were associated with steatosis. Interventions for controlling obesity should be integrated into routine HIV care.

Type: Article
Title: Hepatic steatosis in people older and younger than fifty who are living with HIV and HIV-negative controls: A cross-sectional study nested within the POPPY cohort
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/hiv.13540
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/hiv.13540
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Keywords: HIV, hepatic steatosis, liver disease, obesity
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inst for Liver and Digestive Hlth
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10176968
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