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Model Based Estimation of Posaconazole Tablet and Suspension Bioavailability in Hospitalized Children Using Real-World Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Data in Patients Receiving Intravenous and Oral Dosing

Kane, Zoe; Cheng, Iek; McGarrity, Orlagh; Chiesa, Robert; Klein, Nigel; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Standing, Joseph F; (2023) Model Based Estimation of Posaconazole Tablet and Suspension Bioavailability in Hospitalized Children Using Real-World Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Data in Patients Receiving Intravenous and Oral Dosing. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy , 67 (7) , Article e0007723. 10.1128/aac.00077-23. Green open access

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Abstract

Invasive fungal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality for immunocompromised patients. Posaconazole is approved for treatment and prophylaxis of invasive fungal infection in adult patients, with intravenous, oral suspension, and gastroresistant/delayed-released tablet formulations available. In Europe, until very recently, posaconazole was used off-label in children, although a new delayed-release suspension approved for pediatric use is expected to become available soon. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed which uses posaconazole therapeutic drug monitoring data following intravenous and oral dosing in hospitalized children, thus enabling estimation of pediatric suspension and tablet oral bioavailability. In total, 297 therapeutic drug monitoring plasma levels from 104 children were included in this analysis. The final model was a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and nonlinear elimination. Allometric scaling on clearance and volume of distribution was included a priori. Tablet bioavailability was estimated to be 66%. Suspension bioavailability was estimated to decrease with increasing doses, ranging from 3.8% to 32.2% in this study population. Additionally, concomitant use of proton pump-inhibitors was detected as a significant covariate, reducing suspension bioavailability by 41.0%. This is the first population pharmacokinetic study to model posaconazole data from hospitalized children following intravenous, tablet, and suspension dosing simultaneously. The incorporation of saturable posaconazole clearance into the model has been key to the credible joint estimation of tablet and suspension bioavailability. To aid rational posaconazole dosing in children, this model was used alongside published pharmacodynamic targets to predict the probability of target attainment using typical pediatric dosing regimen.

Type: Article
Title: Model Based Estimation of Posaconazole Tablet and Suspension Bioavailability in Hospitalized Children Using Real-World Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Data in Patients Receiving Intravenous and Oral Dosing
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1128/aac.00077-23
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1128/aac.00077-23
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: bioavailability, pediatric dosing, pediatric drug therapy, pediatric infectious disease, pharmacokinetics, population pharmacokinetics, posaconazole
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10176582
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