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Amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea risk related to exercise training volume and intensity: Findings from 3705 participants recruited via the STRAVA™ exercise application

Baranauskas, Marissa N; Freemas, Jessica A; Carter, Stephen J; Blodgett, Joanna M; Pedlar, Charles R; Bruinvels, Georgie; (2023) Amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea risk related to exercise training volume and intensity: Findings from 3705 participants recruited via the STRAVA™ exercise application. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport , 26 (8) pp. 405-409. 10.1016/j.jsams.2023.07.001.

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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate associations between self-reported exercise training habits and amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea among physically active women. // Design: A cross-sectional survey was completed by 3705 women (median age = 40 years [quartile 1, quartile 3: 30, 45], body mass index = 22.1 kg/m2 [20.5, 24.2]) representing multiple nationalities and sports via the STRAVA™ exercise application. Respondents selected the amount of time they participated in low intensity, moderate intensity, and high intensity exercise training per week. Amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea was defined as self-reporting ≤10 menses in the last year. // Methods: Associations between weekly exercise volume for low intensity training, moderate intensity training, and high intensity training and amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea were modeled with univariate logistic regression models, followed by adjustment for age and body mass index. // Results: Amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea prevalence was 16 % (n = 576/3705), with no difference by country of origin or most sport modes. In adjusted models, participating in low intensity training ≥7 h/week or moderate intensity training ≥6 h/week was associated with 1.43 (95 % confidence interval: 1.04–1.96) and 1.46 (1.10–1.95) greater odds of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea compared to 2 to 3 h/week, respectively. Similarly, high intensity training ≥5 h/week was associated with 1.41 (1.03–1.92) greater odds of amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea compared to 1 to 2 h/week. Participating in low intensity training for ≤30 min/week compared to 2 to 3 h/week was associated with reduced amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea odds (0.65 [0.44–0.94]). // Conclusions: Taken together, these associations suggest greater weekly exercise volume, irrespective of intensity, may increase amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea risk among physically active women.

Type: Article
Title: Amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea risk related to exercise training volume and intensity: Findings from 3705 participants recruited via the STRAVA™ exercise application
Location: Australia
DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2023.07.001
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2023.07.001
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: RED-S; Female athlete triad; Menstrual cycle; Sports; Athlete monitoring
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10176537
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