UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Receptive and participatory arts engagement and subsequent healthy aging: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study

Rena, Melinda; Fancourt, Daisy; Bu, Feifei; Paul, Elise; Sonke, Jill K; Bone, Jessica K; (2023) Receptive and participatory arts engagement and subsequent healthy aging: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study. Social Science & Medicine , 334 , Article 116198. 10.1016/j.socscimed.2023.116198. Green open access

[thumbnail of 1-s2.0-S0277953623005555-main.pdf]
Preview
PDF
1-s2.0-S0277953623005555-main.pdf - Published Version

Download (501kB) | Preview

Abstract

RATIONALE: Arts engagement is associated with prolonged longevity, but it remains unclear whether it is also associated with increases in the portion of people's lives for which they remain healthy. We investigated whether receptive and participatory arts engagement were associated with healthy aging two and four years later. METHOD: We included 1269 older adults from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a longitudinal study of individuals aged 50 and above in the United States. Participants who completed the HRS 2014 Culture and the Arts Module and who were alive in 2016 and 2018 were eligible. We measured the number of participatory arts activities engaged in (e.g., crafts, dancing) and frequency of receptive arts engagement (e.g., going to a gallery or performance) in the past year. Healthy aging was a binary outcome, conceptualized as no major chronic diseases, no cognitive impairment, good physical functioning, and good mental health. RESULTS: In logistic regression models, doing receptive arts once a month or more was associated with higher odds of healthy aging four years later compared to never engaging (odds ratio [OR] = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.10, 2.96). However, this evidence was attenuated after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic covariates (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 0.84, 2.46). The number of participatory arts activities engaged in was not associated with healthy aging two or four years later. In sensitivity analyses, there was some evidence that receptive engagement was associated specifically with higher odds of good physical functioning four years later. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of consistent associations between receptive and participatory arts engagement and healthy aging was unexpected given previous evidence for links between arts engagement and each of the four domains of healthy aging. Our findings highlight key methodological issues that should be explored in further research with larger nationally representative samples, longer follow-ups, and more detailed measures of arts engagement.

Type: Article
Title: Receptive and participatory arts engagement and subsequent healthy aging: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2023.116198
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2023.116198
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Under a Creative Commons license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Cultural engagement, Chronic disease, Cognition, Physical functioning, Mental health
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10176447
Downloads since deposit
33Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item