UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Comparison of culture, confocal microscopy and PCR in routine hospital use for microbial keratitis diagnosis

Hoffman, Jeremy J; Dart, John KG; De, Surjo K; Carnt, Nicole; Cleary, Georgia; Hau, Scott; (2021) Comparison of culture, confocal microscopy and PCR in routine hospital use for microbial keratitis diagnosis. Eye , 36 pp. 2172-2178. 10.1038/s41433-021-01812-7. Green open access

[thumbnail of Comparison of culture, confocal microscopy and PCR in routine hospital use for microbial keratitis diagnosis.pdf]
Preview
Text
Comparison of culture, confocal microscopy and PCR in routine hospital use for microbial keratitis diagnosis.pdf - Other

Download (812kB) | Preview

Abstract

Aims: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and culture for microbial keratitis (MK) diagnosis. Methods: Retrospective review of PCR, IVCM and culture results for MK diagnosis at Moorfields Eye Hospital between August 2013 and December 2014. Results: PCR results were available for 259 MK patients with concurrent culture for 203/259 and IVCM for 149/259. Sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] were calculated for Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and fungal keratitis (FK), by comparison with culture, for both IVCM and PCR. For AK, FK and bacterial keratitis (BK) sensitivities were calculated, for each diagnostic method, by comparison with a composite reference standard (a positive result for one or more of culture, PCR or IVCM having a specificity of 100% by definition). For the latter, sensitivities with [95% CI] were: for AK, IVCM 77.1% [62.7–88.0%], PCR 63.3% [48.3–76.6%], culture 35.6 [21.9–51.2]; for FK, IVCM 81.8% [48.2–97.7%], PCR 30.8% [9.09–61.4%], culture 41.7% [15.2–72.3%]; for BK, PCR 25.0% [14.7–37.9%], culture 95.6% [87.6–99.1%]. Conclusion: IVCM was the most sensitive technique for AK and FK diagnosis but culture remains our gold standard for BK. These findings reflect results to be expected from service providers to UK ophthalmology units and demonstrates the need at our centre for ongoing diagnostic result audit leading to the potential to improve PCR diagnosis. Both FK and AK are now common in the UK; ophthalmology units need to have all these techniques available to optimise their MK management.

Type: Article
Title: Comparison of culture, confocal microscopy and PCR in routine hospital use for microbial keratitis diagnosis
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41433-021-01812-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41433-021-01812-7
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Ophthalmology, POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION, REACTION-GUIDED DIAGNOSIS, ACANTHAMOEBA-KERATITIS, EPIDEMIOLOGY, ACCURACY, TRENDS
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10176419
Downloads since deposit
3Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item