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Role of Static and Dynamic Ocular Biometrics Measured in the Dark and Light as Risk Factors for Angle Closure Progression

Cho, Austin; Xu, Benjamin Y; Friedman, David S; Foster, Paul J; Jiang, Yu; Pardeshi, Anmol A; Jiang, Yuzhen; ... He, Mingguang; + view all (2023) Role of Static and Dynamic Ocular Biometrics Measured in the Dark and Light as Risk Factors for Angle Closure Progression. American Journal of Ophthalmology 10.1016/j.ajo.2023.07.032. (In press).

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess the role of static and dynamic ocular biometric parameters measured in the dark and light for predicting progression of primary angle closure suspect (PACS) to primary angle closure (PAC). DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using prospective RCT data from untreated, control eyes. METHODS: Zhongshan Angle Closure Prevention Trial subjects underwent anterior segment OCT imaging in the dark and light. Static biometric parameters were measured, consisting of angle, iris, lens, and anterior chamber parameters. Dynamic change parameters were calculated by subtracting light measurements from dark measurements. Cox proportional hazards regression models were developed to assess risk factors for PACD progression. RESULTS: 861 eyes of 861 participants were analyzed (36 progressors). On univariable analysis, TISA500 measurements in the light and dark were associated with progression (p<0.001), whereas dynamic change parameters were not (p≥0.08). In the primary multivariable model, older age (HR=1.09 per year), higher IOP (HR = 1.13 per mmHg), and smaller TISA500 in the light (HR=1.28 per 0.01mm2) were significantly associated with greater risk of progression (p≤0.04). Dark TISA500 had similar significance (HR=1.28, p=0.002) when replacing light TISA500. Risk of progression was more predictive among eyes in the lowest quartile of light TISA500 measurements (HR=4.56, p<0.001) compared to dark measurements (HR=2.89, p=0.003). CONCLUSION: Static parameters measured in the light are as predictive, and possibly more so, of angle closure progression as those measured in the dark. Ocular biometrics measured under light and dark conditions may provide additional information for risk-stratifying patients for angle closure progression.

Type: Article
Title: Role of Static and Dynamic Ocular Biometrics Measured in the Dark and Light as Risk Factors for Angle Closure Progression
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajo.2023.07.032
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2023.07.032
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10175119
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