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SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Binding of Glycated Serum Albumin-Its Potential Role in the Pathogenesis of the COVID-19 Clinical Syndromes and Bias towards Individuals with Pre-Diabetes/Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases

Iles, Jason; Zmuidinaite, Raminta; Sadee, Christoph; Gardiner, Anna; Lacey, Jonathan; Harding, Stephen; Ule, Jernej; ... Iles, Ray K; + view all (2022) SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Binding of Glycated Serum Albumin-Its Potential Role in the Pathogenesis of the COVID-19 Clinical Syndromes and Bias towards Individuals with Pre-Diabetes/Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases. International Journal of Molecular Sciences , 23 (8) , Article 4126. 10.3390/ijms23084126. Green open access

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Abstract

The immune response to SARS‐CoV‐2 infection requires antibody recognition of the spike protein. In a study designed to examine the molecular features of anti‐spike and anti‐nucleocapsid antibodies, patient plasma proteins binding to pre‐fusion stabilised complete spike and nucleocap-sid proteins were isolated and analysed by matrix‐assisted laser desorption ionisation–time of flight (MALDI‐ToF) mass spectrometry. Amongst the immunoglobulins, a high affinity for human serum albumin was evident in the anti‐spike preparations. Careful mass comparison revealed the preferential capture of advanced glycation end product (AGE) forms of glycated human serum albumin by the pre‐fusion spike protein. The ability of bacteria and viruses to surround themselves with serum proteins is a recognised immune evasion and pathogenic process. The preference of SARS‐ CoV‐2 for AGE forms of glycated serum albumin may in part explain the severity and pathology of acute respiratory distress and the bias towards the elderly and those with (pre)diabetic and athero-sclerotic/metabolic disease.

Type: Article
Title: SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Binding of Glycated Serum Albumin-Its Potential Role in the Pathogenesis of the COVID-19 Clinical Syndromes and Bias towards Individuals with Pre-Diabetes/Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3390/ijms23084126
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23084126
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Physical Sciences, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Chemistry, Multidisciplinary, Chemistry, COVID-19, convalescent plasma, spike protein, nucleocapsid, glycated albumin, semi-automated magnetic rack
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Department of Neuromuscular Diseases
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10174368
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