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Alcohol and smoking brief interventions by socioeconomic position: British population-based survey

Buss, Vera; Cox, sharon; Moore, Graham; Shahab, Lion; Angus, Colin; Bauld, Linda; Brown, James; (2023) Alcohol and smoking brief interventions by socioeconomic position: British population-based survey. British Journal of General Practice Open , 3 (4) , Article BJGPO.2023.0087. 10.3399/BJGPO.2023.0087. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Alcohol and smoking brief interventions (BIs) in general practice have been shown to be effective in lowering alcohol and smoking-related harm. AIM: To assess prevalence of self-reported BI receipt among increasing or higher-risk drinkers and past-year smokers in England, Scotland, and Wales, and associations between intervention receipt and socioeconomic position. DESIGN & SETTING: Design & setting Cross-sectional study using data from a monthly population-based survey in England, Scotland, and Wales. METHOD: The study comprised 47 799 participants (15 573 increasing or higher-risk drinkers [alcohol use disorders identification test consumption score ≥5] and 7791 past-year smokers) surveyed via telephone in 2020–2022 (during the COVID-19 pandemic). All data were self-reported. Prevalence of self-reported BI receipt was assessed descriptively; associations between receipt and socioeconomic position were analysed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Among adults in England, Scotland, and Wales, 32.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 31.8 to 32.7) reported increasing or higher-risk drinking and 17.7% (95% CI = 17.3 to 18.1) past-year smoking. Among increasing or higher-risk drinkers, 58.0% (95% CI = 57.1 to 58.9) consulted with a GP in the past year, and of these, 4.1% (95% CI = 3.6 to 4.6) reported receiving BIs. Among past-year smokers, 55.8% (95% CI = 54.5 to 57.1) attended general practice in the past year; of these, 41.0% (95% CI = 39.4 to 42.7) stated receiving BIs. There was a tendency for patients from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds to receive more alcohol (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.38, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.73) or smoking BIs (aOR 1.11, 95% CI = 0.98 to 1.26), but for the latter the results were statistically non-significant. Results did not differ notably by nation within Great Britain. CONCLUSION: BIs in general practice are more common for smoking than for alcohol. A greater proportion of BIs for alcohol were found to be delivered to people who were from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds and who were increasing or higher-risk drinkers.

Type: Article
Title: Alcohol and smoking brief interventions by socioeconomic position: British population-based survey
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3399/BJGPO.2023.0087
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3399/BJGPO.2023.0087
Language: English
Additional information: This article is Open Access: CC BY license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: General practice, drinking behaviour, smoking, socioeconomic position, cross-sectional studies, substance intervention
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10174336
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