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Ex Vivo Perfusion of Porcine Pancreas and Liver Sourced from Commercial Abattoirs after Circulatory Death as a Research Resource: A Methodological Study

Rai, Zainab L; Magbagbeola, Morenike; Doyle, Katie; Lindenroth, Lukas; Dwyer, George; Gander, Amir; Stilli, Agostino; ... Davidson, Brian R; + view all (2023) Ex Vivo Perfusion of Porcine Pancreas and Liver Sourced from Commercial Abattoirs after Circulatory Death as a Research Resource: A Methodological Study. Methods and Protocols , 6 (4) , Article 66. 10.3390/mps6040066. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Machine perfusion (MP) is increasingly used for human transplant organ preservation. The use of MP for research purposes is another opportunity for this technology. The porcine pancreas and liver are similar in anatomical size and function to their human counterparts, making them an excellent resource for research, but they have some important differences from human organs which can influence their research use. In this paper, we describe a technique developed and tested for the retrieval of porcine organs for use in research on perfused viable organs. Methods: Whole-organ porcine pancreata and livers were harvested at a commercial abattoir, following standard slaughterhouse processes. The standard slaughterhouse process involved a thoracotomy and mid-line laparotomy, and all the thoracoabdominal organs were removed. The pancreas, fixed in the retroperitoneum, was carefully dissected from its attachments to the surrounding structures, and tissue planes between the pancreas, spleen, duodenum, and colon were meticulously identified and dissected. Vessel exposure and division: The aorta, portal vein (PV), hepatic vein (HV), and hepatic artery (HA) were dissected and isolated, preserving the input and output channels for the liver and pancreas. A distal 3 cm of the aorta was preserved and divided and served as the input for the pancreas perfusions. The liver, PV, HV, and HA were preserved and divided to preserve the physiological channels of the input (PV and HA) and output (HV) for the liver perfusions. The porcine hepatic and pancreas anatomy shares significant resemblance with the gross anatomy found in humans, and this was taken into consideration when designing the perfusion circuitry. The porcine pancreas and spleen shared a common blood supply, with branches arising from the splenic artery. The organs were flushed with cold, heparinised normal saline and transported in a temperature-regulated receptacle maintained at a core temperature between 4 and 8 °C, in line with the standards of static cold storage (SCS), to a dedicated perfusion lab and perfused using our novel perfusion machine with autologous, heparinised porcine blood, also collected at the abattoir.

Type: Article
Title: Ex Vivo Perfusion of Porcine Pancreas and Liver Sourced from Commercial Abattoirs after Circulatory Death as a Research Resource: A Methodological Study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3390/mps6040066
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.3390/mps6040066
Language: English
Additional information: © 2023 by the Authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: machine perfusion; whole-organ research; 3Rs
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10173605
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