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Real-time, model-based magnetic field correction for moving, wearable MEG

Mellor, Stephanie; Tierney, Tim M; Seymour, Robert A; Timms, Ryan C; O'Neill, George C; Alexander, Nicholas; Spedden, Meaghan E; ... Barnes, Gareth R; + view all (2023) Real-time, model-based magnetic field correction for moving, wearable MEG. NeuroImage 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2023.120252. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Most neuroimaging techniques require the participant to remain still for reliable recordings to be made. Optically pumped magnetometer (OPM) based magnetoencephalography (OP-MEG) however, is a neuroimaging technique which can be used to measure neural signals during large participant movement (approximately 1 m) within a magnetically shielded room (MSR) (Boto et al., 2018; Seymour et al., 2021). Nevertheless, environmental magnetic fields vary both spatially and temporally and OPMs can only operate within a limited magnetic field range, which constrains participant movement. Here we implement real-time updates to electromagnetic coils mounted on-board of the OPMs, to cancel out the changing background magnetic fields. The coil currents were chosen based on a continually updating harmonic model of the background magnetic field, effectively implementing homogeneous field correction (HFC) in real-time (Tierney et al., 2021). During a stationary, empty room recording, we show an improvement in very low frequency noise of 24 dB. In an auditory paradigm, during participant movement of up to 2 m within a magnetically shielded room, introduction of the real-time correction more than doubled the proportion of trials in which no sensor saturated recorded outside of a 50 cm radius from the optimally-shielded centre of the room. The main advantage of such model-based (rather than direct) feedback is that it could allow one to correct field components along unmeasured OPM axes, potentially mitigating sensor gain and calibration issues (Borna et al., 2022).

Type: Article
Title: Real-time, model-based magnetic field correction for moving, wearable MEG
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2023.120252
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2023.120252
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third-party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10173592
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